33rd Annual Grammy Awards

Last updated
33rd Annual Grammy Awards
DateFebruary 20, 1991
Location Radio City Music Hall, New York, New York
Hosted by Garry Shandling [1]
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS

The 33rd Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 20, 1991. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. Quincy Jones was the night's biggest winner winning a total of six awards including Album of the Year. [2] [3]

Quincy Jones American record producer, conductor, arranger, composer, television producer, and trumpeter

Quincy Delight Jones Jr. is an American record producer, musician, composer, and film producer. His career spans six decades in the entertainment industry with a record 80 Grammy Award nominations, 28 Grammys, and a Grammy Legend Award in 1992.

Contents

Award winners

General

Record of the Year
Another Day in Paradise song by Phil Collins

"Another Day in Paradise" is a song recorded by English drummer, singer-songwriter Phil Collins. Produced by Collins along with Hugh Padgham, it was released as the first single from his number-one album ...But Seriously (1989). As with his song for Genesis, "Man on the Corner", the track has as its subject the problem of homelessness; as such, the song was a substantial departure from the dance-pop music of his previous album, No Jacket Required (1985).

Phil Collins English musician, songwriter and actor

Philip David Charles Collins is an English drummer, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, and actor. He was the drummer and singer of the rock band Genesis, and is also a solo artist. Between 1982 and 1989, Collins scored three UK and seven US number-one singles in his solo career. When his work with Genesis, his work with other artists, as well as his solo career is totalled, Collins had more US Top 40 singles than any other artist during the 1980s. His most successful singles from the period include "In the Air Tonight", "Against All Odds ", "One More Night", "Sussudio", "Two Hearts" and "Another Day in Paradise".

Hugh Charles Padgham is an English record producer and audio engineer. He has won four Grammy Awards, for Producer of the Year and Album of the Year for 1985, Record of the Year for 1990, and Engineer of the Year for 1993. A 1992 poll in Mix magazine voted him one of the world's "Top Ten Most Influential Producers". Padgham co-productions include hits by Phil Collins, XTC, Genesis, The Human League, Sting, and The Police. He pioneered the gated reverb drum sound used most famously on the Phil Collins single "In the Air Tonight".

Album of the Year
<i>Back on the Block</i> 1989 studio album by Quincy Jones

Back on the Block is a 1989 studio album produced by Quincy Jones. The album features legendary musicians and singers from across three generations, including Ella Fitzgerald, Miles Davis, Joe Zawinul, Ice-T, Big Daddy Kane, Sarah Vaughan, Dizzy Gillespie, George Benson, Luther Vandross, Dionne Warwick, Barry White, Chaka Khan, Take 6, Bobby McFerrin, Al Jarreau, Al B. Sure!, James Ingram, El DeBarge, Ray Charles and a 12-year old Tevin Campbell.

Song of the Year
Julie Gold American musician

Julie Gold is an American singer-songwriter. She is best known for her musical composition "From a Distance," which became a hit for Bette Midler and won a Grammy Award for Song of the Year in 1991.

Bette Midler American singer-songwriter, actress, comedian and film producer

Bette Midler is an American singer, songwriter, actress, comedian, and film producer.

Best New Artist
Mariah Carey American female singer-songwriter

Mariah Carey is an American singer and songwriter. Referred to as the "Songbird Supreme" by the Guinness World Records, she is noted for her five-octave vocal range, power, melismatic style, and signature use of the whistle register. She rose to fame in 1990 after signing to Columbia Records and releasing her eponymous debut album, which topped the US Billboard 200 for 11 consecutive weeks. Soon after, Carey became the first and only artist to have their first five singles reach number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, from "Vision of Love" to "Emotions".

Lisa Stansfield English singer and songwriter

Lisa Jane Stansfield is an English singer, songwriter and actress. Her career began in 1980 when she won the singing competition Search for a Star. After appearances in various television shows and releasing her first singles, Stansfield, Ian Devaney and Andy Morris formed Blue Zone in 1984. The band released several singles and one album, but after the success of "People Hold On" in 1989, on which Stansfield was featured, they focused on her solo career.

The Black Crowes American rock band

The Black Crowes were an American rock band formed in 1989. Their discography includes eight studio albums, four live albums and several charting singles. The band was signed to Def American Recordings in 1989 by producer George Drakoulias and released its debut album, Shake Your Money Maker, the following year. The follow-up, The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion, reached the top of the Billboard 200 in 1992. After a hiatus between 2002 and 2005, the band regrouped and toured for several years before releasing Warpaint in 2008, which hit number 5 on the Billboard chart. After the release of a greatest hits/acoustic double album Croweology in August 2010, the band started a 20th anniversary tour that was followed by a second hiatus. After a final tour in 2013, the band finally announced its break-up in 2015.

Alternative

Sinéad OConnor Irish singer

Shuhada' Davitt is an Irish singer-songwriter who rose to fame in the late 1980s with her debut album The Lion and the Cobra. As Sinéad O'Connor, she achieved worldwide success in 1990 with a new arrangement of Prince's song "Nothing Compares 2 U".

<i>I Do Not Want What I Havent Got</i> 1990 studio album by Sinéad OConnor

I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got is the second album by Irish singer Sinéad O'Connor, released in March 1990 on Ensign/Chrysalis Records. It contains O'Connor's version of the Prince song "Nothing Compares 2 U", which was released as a single and reached number one in multiple countries. The album was nominated for four Grammy Awards in 1991, including Record of the Year, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, and Best Music Video, Short Form for "Nothing Compares 2 U", winning the award for Best Alternative Music Performance. However, O'Connor refused to accept the nominations and award.

Blues

Children's

Classical

Comedy

Composing and arranging

Country

Folk

Gospel

Historical

Jazz

Latin

Musical show

Music video

New Age

Packaging and notes

Polka

Pop

Production and engineering

R&B

Rap

Reggae

Rock

Spoken

Special merit awards

MusiCares Person of the Year

Reception

In a contemporary review, Variety described the telecast was "one of the most unmemorable in memory" and that "This year's telecast was doomed from the moment Sinead O'Connor, the artist behind the year's most compelling record, announced that she would boycott the show because the awards celebrate commercialism." [4] The review critiqued the performers stating that Garth Brooks stage set up resembled a "Noël Coward play", Billy Idol changed a lyric of "Cradle of Love" to state "This song is so cheesy" and that MC Hammer appeared to be wrapped in aluminium foil. [4]

The review spoke positively about performance of En Vogue and Take 6 and the a cappella performance by Tracy Chapman. [4]

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References

Footnotes

  1. "33rd Annual Grammy Awards". The Recording Academy . Retrieved 2016-03-24.
  2. "Quincy Jones wins block of Grammys". The Milwaukee Journal. 1991-02-21. Retrieved 2011-05-01.
  3. "1990 Grammy Award Winners". Grammy.com. Retrieved 2011-05-01.
  4. 1 2 3 Prouty 1994: "No page number in the book. Review is dated "February 21, 1991""

Sources

  • Prouty, Howard H., ed. (1994). Variety Television Reviews 1923-1992. Garland Publishing Inc. ISBN   0-8240-3796-0.