Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male

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Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male
Awarded forQuality male jazz vocal performances
CountryUnited States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1981
Last awarded1991
Website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, [1] to male recording artists for quality jazz vocal performances (songs or albums). Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". [2]

Grammy Award Accolade by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States

A Grammy Award, or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy to recognize achievements in the music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest. The Grammys are the second of the Big Three major music awards held annually.

Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States. It originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz is seen by many as "America's classical music". Since the 1920s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American and European-American musical parentage with a performance orientation. Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music. Intellectuals around the world have hailed jazz as "one of America's original art forms".

Contents

Prior to 1981, the gender-neutral category of Best Jazz Vocal Performance existed. [3] The first award specifically for male performances was presented to George Benson in 1981 for the song "Moody's Mood". The category remained unchanged until 1985, when it was combined with the award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female and presented in the genderless category. Gender-specific awards were once again presented from 1986 until 1991. In 1992, the two categories were combined and presented as the category Best Jazz Vocal Performance. This category was later renamed to Best Jazz Vocal Album beginning in 2001. While the gender-specific award has not been presented since the category merge in 1992, an official confirmation of its retirement has not been announced.

The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality works in the vocal jazz music genre. Awards in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".

George Benson American recording artist, guitarist, singer, and songwriter

George Benson is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. He began his professional career at the age of 21 as a jazz guitarist. Benson uses a rest-stroke picking technique similar to that of gypsy jazz players such as Django Reinhardt.

"Moody's Mood for Love" is a 1952 song by Eddie Jefferson, whose melody is derived from an improvised solo by jazz saxophonist James Moody on a 1949 recording of the 1935 song "I'm in the Mood for Love". It gained widespread popularity after being recorded in 1954 by singer King Pleasure. It has since been covered by many artists. Moody himself adopted the song as his own, recording it with Jefferson on the 1956 album Moody's Mood for Love and often singing the song himself in concert.

Bobby McFerrin holds the record for the most wins in this category, with a total of four consecutive wins from 1986 to 1989 (once along with Jon Hendricks). Mel Tormé and Harry Connick, Jr. each received the award twice. An American artist received the award each year it was presented. Tormé holds the record for the most nominations, with six. Mark Murphy and Joe Williams hold the record for the most nominations without a win, with a total of four each.

Bobby McFerrin American jazz vocalist and conductor

Robert Keith McFerrin Jr. is an American jazz vocalist and conductor. A ten-time Grammy Award winner, he is known for his unique vocal techniques, such as singing fluidly but with quick and considerable jumps in pitch—for example, sustaining a melody while also rapidly alternating with arpeggios and harmonies—as well as scat singing, polyphonic overtone singing, and improvisational vocal percussion. He is widely known for performing and recording regularly as an unaccompanied solo vocal artist. He has frequently collaborated with other artists from both the jazz and classical scenes.

Jon Hendricks American jazz singer, lyricist, jazz critic and historian

John Carl Hendricks, known professionally as Jon Hendricks, was an American jazz lyricist and singer. He is one of the originators of vocalese, which adds lyrics to existing instrumental songs and replaces many instruments with vocalists, such as the big-band arrangements of Duke Ellington and Count Basie. He is considered one of the best practitioners of scat singing, which involves vocal jazz soloing. Jazz critic and historian Leonard Feather called him the "Poet Laureate of Jazz", while Time dubbed him the "James Joyce of Jive". Al Jarreau called him "pound-for-pound the best jazz singer on the planet—maybe that's ever been".

Mel Tormé American recording artist, singer, songwriter, actor, writer, music arranger

Melvin Howard Tormé, best known as Mel Tormé and nicknamed The Velvet Fog, was an American musician, a singer of jazz standards, a jazz composer and arranger, drummer, an actor in radio, film, and television, and the author of five books. He composed the music for "The Christmas Song" and co-wrote the lyrics with Bob Wells.

Recipients

1982 award winner Al Jarreau AlJarreauEarly1980s (edited).jpg
1982 award winner Al Jarreau
Two-time award winner Mel Torme Mel Torme (1979).jpg
Two-time award winner Mel Tormé
Two-time award winner Harry Connick, Jr. Harry Connick, Jr..jpg
Two-time award winner Harry Connick, Jr.
Chronological list of award recipients and nominees along with all nominated works
Year [I] Performing artist(s)WorkNomineesRef.
1981 George Benson "Moody's Mood" [4]
1982 Al Jarreau "(Round, Round, Round) Blue Rondo à la Turk"
  • Johnny HartmanOnce in Every Life
  • Jimmy RowlesMusic's the Only Thing (That's) On My Mind
  • Mel TorméMel Tormé and Friends Recorded Live at Marty's New York City
  • Joe Turner – Have No Fear, Joe Turner Is Here
[5]
1983 Mel Tormé An Evening with George Shearing & Mel Tormé [6]
1984 Mel Tormé Top Drawer [7]
1985 [II] [8]
1986 Bobby McFerrin and Jon Hendricks "Another Night in Tunisia" [9]
1987 Bobby McFerrin "'Round Midnight" [10]
1988 Bobby McFerrin "What Is This Thing Called Love?" [11]
1989 Bobby McFerrin "Brothers" [12]
1990 Harry Connick, Jr. When Harry Met Sally... [13]
1991 Harry Connick, Jr. We Are in Love [14]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] Award was combined with the Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female category and presented in a genderless category known as Best Jazz Vocal Performance.

The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to female recording artists for quality jazz vocal performances. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".

See also

The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Duo or Group was presented from 1981 to 1990.

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References

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