Archdeacon of Gloucester

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The Archdeacon of Gloucester is a senior ecclesiastical officer in the Diocese of Gloucester, England whose responsibilities include the care of clergy and church buildings within the area of the Archdeaconry of Gloucester.

Contents

History

The first recorded archdeacons of the Diocese of Worcester occur from c.1086 – the same sort of time that archdeacons occur across the church in England. Two archdeacons are recorded simultaneously from that time, but no clear territorial title occurs until 1143, when Gervase is called Archdeacon of Gloucester. [1]

The archdeaconry was within Worcester diocese for almost 500 years, until it was formed into the newly created Diocese of Gloucester on 13 September 1541, as part of the Henrician reformation. The new diocese was briefly dissolved and returned to Worcester again on 20 May 1552 [2] until Worcester and Gloucester were re-divided again at by Queen Mary in 1554. [3] [4] [5] From 5 October 1836, when the diocese was merged with Bristol [6] and 9 July 1897, when Bristol became an independent diocese again, [7] the archdeaconry was in the Diocese of Gloucester and Bristol. Parts of Gloucester archdeaconry were used to create the Cirencester archdeaconry (since renamed Cheltenham) on 8 December 1882. [8]

The archdeaconry consists of the deaneries of Forest, Gloucester City, Severn Vale, Stroud, & Wotton.

List of archdeacons

Related Research Articles

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Archdeacon of Surrey

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References

  1. Greenway, Diana E. (1971), Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300, vol. 2, pp. 104–105
  2. Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541–1857, vol. 7, 1992, pp. 105–109
  3. "Hooper, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/13706.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  4. Pollard, Albert Frederick (1911). "Hooper, John"  . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica . Vol. 13 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 675–676.
  5. Lee, Sidney, ed. (1891). "Hooper, John"  . Dictionary of National Biography . Vol. 27. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  6. "No. 19426". The London Gazette . 7 October 1836. pp. 1734–1738.
  7. "No. 26871". The London Gazette . 9 July 1897. p. 3787.
  8. "No. 25175". The London Gazette . 8 December 1882. pp. 6241–6242.
  9. "Prevost, Sir George, second baronet (1804–1893), Church of England clergyman - Oxford Dictionary of National Biography". www.oxforddnb.com. Archived from the original on 28 May 2019. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  10. "Sheringham, John William" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  11. "Bowers, John Phillips Allcot" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  12. "Scobell, Edward Chessall" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  13. "Hobhouse, Walter" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2007 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  14. "Ridsdale, Charles Henry" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  15. Gloucester Archives: Online Catalogue – Letters of collation of Hodson to the Archdeaconry, 1933
  16. "Hodson, Augustine John" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  17. "Wardle, Walter Thomas" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 1920–2008 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  18. "Wagstaff, Christopher John Harold" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 2013 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  19. "Sidaway, Geoffrey Harold" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 2013 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  20. Sidaway died 20 April 2014: Church Times, Issue 7886, 9 May 2014. Obituaries, p. 38
  21. "Searle, Jacqueline Ann" . Who's Who . ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 2013 (December 2012 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 10 May 2013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  22. says, Simon Ford. "New Archdeacon of Gloucester and Residentiary Canon of Gloucester Cathedral". Archived from the original on 10 November 2018. Retrieved 16 July 2020.

Sources