Athletics at the 1912 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the V Olympiad
1912 Athletics men's 100 metre final3.JPG
The finish of the final.
Venue Stockholm Olympic Stadium
Dates6–7 July
Competitors70 from 22 nations
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Ralph Craig US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Alvah Meyer US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Donald Lippincott US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
  1908
1920  

The men's 100 metres was a track and field athletics event held as part of the Athletics at the 1912 Summer Olympics programme. It was the fifth appearance of the event, which is one of 12 athletics events to have been held at every Summer Olympics. The competition was held on 6 July 1912 and on 7 July 1912. Seventy runners from 22 nations competed. [1] NOCs could enter up to 12 athletes. [2] The event was won by Ralph Craig of the United States, as the Americans swept the medals for a second time (previously having done so in 1904).

Contents

Background

This was the fifth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. None of the 1908 medalists returned in 1912. Notable entrants included Erwin Kern, Emil Ketterer, and Richard Rau of Germany, who shared the unofficial world record; George Patching of South Africa, the 1910 and 1911 AAA Championships winner; and United States Olympic Trials winners Ira Courtney, Clement Wilson, and Howard Drew. [3]

Chile (disputed, as Luis Subercaseaux may have run in 1896), Iceland, Japan, Portugal, Russia, and Serbia were represented in the event for the first time. "Australasia" also appeared for the first time, though Australia had previously competed. The United States and Hungary were the only two nations to have appeared at each of the first five Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event maintained the three round format from 1908: heats, semifinals, and a final. This time, however, the top two runners in each of the 17 heats advanced to the semifinals. These 34 semifinalists (which became 33, as the first heat had only 1 runner) were divided into 6 semifinal heats; only the top runner in each semifinal advanced to the final.

Records

These were the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1912 Summer Olympics.

World Record10.5(*) Flag of the German Empire.svg Emil Ketterer Karlsruhe (GER)July 9, 1911
10.5(*) Flag of the German Empire.svg Richard Rau Braunschweig (GER)August 13, 1911
10.5(*) Flag of the German Empire.svg Richard Rau Munich (GER)May 12, 1912
10.5(*) Flag of the German Empire.svg Erwin Kern Munich (GER)May 26, 1912
Olympic Record10.8 Flag of the United States.svg Frank Jarvis Paris (FRA)July 14, 1900
10.8 Flag of the United States.svg Walter Tewksbury Paris (FRA)July 14, 1900
10.8 Flag of the United States.svg James Rector London (GBR)July 20, 1908
10.8(**) South Africa Flag 1910-1912.svg Reggie Walker London (GBR)July 21, 1908
10.8 Flag of the United States.svg James Rector London (GBR)July 21, 1908
10.8 South Africa Flag 1910-1912.svg Reggie Walker London (GBR)July 22, 1908

(*) unofficial

(**) Actual time was 10.7, rounded up to the nearest fifth, in accordance with rules in force at the time. So his time was only given as 1045.

The Olympic record for the 100 metres coming into 1912 was 10.8 seconds. It was matched by David Jacobs of Great Britain in the 10th heat before being broken by American Donald Lippincott with 10.6 seconds in the 16th heat. This was also the inaugural official world record in the 100 metres. Three semifinalists (including Lippincott) ran the race in 10.7 seconds, but the new record of 10.6 seconds stood for the rest of the event.

Results

Heats

All heats were held on Saturday, July 6, 1912.

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Charles Luther Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 12.8 Q

Heat 2

Möller and Szalay were close at 70 metres; "Möller was stronger in the finish, however, and won by something more than half a metre." [4]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ivan Möller Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 11.5 Q
2 Pál Szalay Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary Q
3 Rudolf Rauch Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg  Austria

Heat 3

There was much separation at the top of this heat; Courtney "won without being extended" and Jankovich "was a very easy second." [4]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ira Courtney US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.2 Q
2 István Jankovich Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary Q
3 Pierre Failliot Flag of France.svg  France
4 Henry Blakeney Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
5 Ladislav Jiránek-Strana Bohemian Olympic Flag (1912).svg  Bohemia
6 Pablo Eitel Flag of Chile.svg  Chile

Heat 4

With both runners assured of advancement to the semifinals, they "ran the course very quietly" with Rice "breaking the tape easily ahead of" Smedmark. [4]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Richard Rice Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.4 Q
2 Rolf Smedmark Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Q

Heat 5

This was a close race between the top two placers, with d'Arcy "shak[ing] off" Povey at the end and winning "by a metre." [4]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Victor d'Arcy Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.2 Q
2 Reuben Povey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  South Africa Q
3 António Stromp Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal

Heat 6

Rau started strongly and led throughout. [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Richard Rau Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany 11.5 Q
2 Vilmos Rácz Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary Q
3 Ture Person Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
4 Robert Schurrer Flag of France.svg  France
5 Dimitrios Triantafyllakos Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece
6 Leopolds Lēvenšteins Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia

Heat 7

In one of the faster heats, Stewart finished "well in front of [Aelter], who also ran very well." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 William Stewart Flag of Australasian team for Olympic games.svg  Australasia 11.0 Q
2 Léon Aelter Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Q
3 Charles Lelong Flag of France.svg  France
4 Jan Grijseels Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
5 Richard Schwarz Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia

Heat 8

Lindberg won the heat "easily." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Knut Lindberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 11.6 Q
2 Bedřich Vygoda Bohemian Olympic Flag (1912).svg  Bohemia 11.6 Q
3 Dušan Milošević State Flag of Serbia (1882-1918).svg  Serbia 11.6
4 Jón Halldórsson Flag of Denmark.svg  Iceland 12.1

Heat 9

Meyer "won without any apparent effort," as Giongo "ran well, although he was not the same class as the American." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Alvah Meyer US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.6 Q
2 Franco Giongo Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy Q
3 Robert Duncan Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
4 Georges Rolot Flag of France.svg  France

Heat 10

Jacobs matched the Olympic record in a tight heat, neck-and-neck with Wilson for most of the way before winning by "a hands-breadth." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 David Jacobs Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.8 Q, =OR
2 Clement Wilson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States Q
3 Marius Delaby Flag of France.svg  France
4 Herman Sotaaen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
5 Václav Labík-Gregan Bohemian Olympic Flag (1912).svg  Bohemia

Heat 11

Belote was "a safe winner, after a very quick finish." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frank Belote US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0 Q
2 René Mourlon Flag of France.svg  France Q
3 Henry Macintosh Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
4 Harry Beasley Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg  Canada

Heat 12

Weinzinger had a good start and led at 25 metres before falling to third. Gerhard "was clearly the best man." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Peter Gerhardt US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.2 Q
2 Frank Lukeman Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg  Canada Q
3 Fritz Weinzinger Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg  Austria
4 Alexander Pedersen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
5 Duncan Macmillan Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain

Heat 13

Patching had a false start. The top three men were close, with Patching leading at 85 metres but Howard taking the lead at the end by "the least bit." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 John Howard Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg  Canada 11.0 Q
2 George Patching Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  South Africa Q
3 Harold Heiland US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
4 Pavel Shtiglits Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg  Russia
Emil Ketterer Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany Did not finish

Heat 14

McConnell led early but faltered at the end; Thomas passed him for the second qualifying spot "just before reaching the post." [5]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Arthur Anderson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.0 Q
2 Rupert Thomas US flag 48 stars.svg  United States Q
3 Frank McConnell Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg  Canada
4 Skotte Jacobsson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

Heat 15

There was a false start. Drew "won easily" with Kern "a pretty good distance behind." [6]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Howard Drew US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0 Q
2 Erwin Kern Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany Q
3 Julien Boullery Flag of France.svg  France
James Barker Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain Did not finish

Heat 16

There were two false starts in this heat before, on the third try, Lippincott set a new Olympic record and the first official world record. He "led from start to finish, and gave the impression that he would be an easy winner, but Applegarth came on very quickly in the last 20 metres, and Lippincott had to do his very best in order to keep the lead." [7]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Donald Lippincott US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.6 Q, OR
2 Willie Applegarth Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain Q
3 Max Herrmann Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany
4 Ervin Szerelemhegyi Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary
5 Yahiko Mishima Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan

Heat 17

Ekberg started well and led through halfway before being passed by Craig and Szobota at around 60 metres. Craig then "won easily" over Szobota. [7]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ralph Craig US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.2 Q
2 Ferenc Szobota Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary Q
3 Ragnar Ekberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
4 Fritz Fleischer Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg  Austria

Semifinals

All semi-finals were held on Saturday, July 6, 1912.

Semifinal 1

Drew "ran magnificently" and used a "powerful, concentrated finish" to become "a safe winner." [7]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Howard Drew US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0 Q
2 Ira Courtney US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
3 Peter Gerhardt US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
4 Charles Luther Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
5 Erwin Kern Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany
6 Vilmos Rácz Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary

Semifinal 2

Patching had another false start in this round. Lindberg fell behind early, dropping to fourth place at the halfway mark, but challenged Patching with a "hard spurt" at the end. The distance between the two was too much for him to make up, however. [7]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 George Patching Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  South Africa 10.9 Q
2 Knut Lindberg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
3 Richard Rice Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
4 Franco Giongo Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy
5 Léon Aelter Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium

Semifinal 3

In an event marred by false starts, this semifinal heat was decided by a legal start that one runner thought false. Smedmark was off first, but came to a stop thinking he had false started. The remaining runners saw a "hard struggle between Meyer and Jacobs" with Meyer "strongest in the last 10 metres" to win. [8]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Alvah Meyer US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.7 Q
2 David Jacobs Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
3 Frank Lukeman Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg  Canada
4 Pál Szalay Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary
Rolf Smedmark Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden DNF

Semifinal 4

This semifinal heat featured 9 false starts. Rau led for the first 70 metres before being caught by Craig, who "won by more than a metre." [9]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ralph Craig US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.7 Q
2 Richard Rau Flag of the German Empire.svg  Germany 10.9
3 William Stewart Flag of Australasian team for Olympic games.svg  Australasia
4 István Jankovich Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary
5 René Mourlon Flag of France.svg  France
6 Ferenc Szobota Flag of Hungary (1867-1918).svg  Hungary
The start of the final. 1912 Athletics men's 100 metre final.JPG
The start of the final.
Immediately after the start of the final. 1912 Athletics men's 100 metre final2.JPG
Immediately after the start of the final.

Semifinal 5

This heat had a "sharp struggle for the lead during the whole of the race." [9]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Donald Lippincott US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.7 Q
2 Willie Applegarth Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
3 Bedřich Vygoda Bohemian Olympic Flag (1912).svg  Bohemia
4 Clement Wilson US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
5 Victor d'Arcy Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
6 John Howard Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg  Canada

Semifinal 6

Belote led throughout. [9]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frank Belote US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.1 Q
2 Reuben Povey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  South Africa
3 Rupert Thomas US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
4 Ivan Möller Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
5 Arthur Anderson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain

Final

The final was held on Sunday, July 7, 1912. Drew was forced to scratch from the final after he pulled a tendon at the end of the first semi-final. The final featured between 6 and 8 false starts, including one where Craig and Lippincott ignored the recall gun and ran the entire distance. Patching had the strongest start and led at 40 metres by half a metre. Craig caught Patching at 60 metres. At the 75-metre mark, Craig was "a hand's-breadth" ahead of Patching and Meyer, with Lippincott and Belote another half-metre back. At the end, "Craig ran brilliantly and with enormous power." Meyer separated from Patching, who stayed in the third spot until "the last few strides" before being passed "almost on the very line" by Lippincott. [3] [10]

The official report gives the result as Ralph Craig 1045, Alvah Meyer 60 cm behind winner, and Donald Lippincott 15 cm behind second man.

RankAthleteNationTime
Gold medal icon.svg Ralph Craig US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.8
Silver medal icon.svg Alvah Meyer US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.9
Bronze medal icon.svg Donald Lippincott US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.9
4 George Patching Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  South Africa 11.0
5 Frank Belote US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.0
Howard Drew US flag 48 stars.svg  United States DNS

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1912 Stockholm Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 22 December 2015.
  2. Official report, p. 61.
  3. 1 2 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  4. 1 2 3 4 Official Report, p. 350.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Official Report, p. 351.
  6. Official Report, pp. 351–52.
  7. 1 2 3 4 Official Report, p. 352.
  8. Official Report, pp. 352–53.
  9. 1 2 3 Official Report, p. 353.
  10. Official Report, pp. 353–54.