Bob and weave

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Bob and weave

In boxing, bobbing and weaving is a defensive technique that moves the head both beneath and laterally of an incoming punch. As the opponent's punch arrives, the fighter bends the legs quickly and simultaneously shifts the body either slightly right or left. Fighters generally begin weaving to the left, as most opponents are orthodox stance, and therefore strike with a left jab first. Common mistakes made with this move include bending at the waist, bending too low, moving in the same direction as the incoming punch, and squaring up. [1] Zak GOD Taylor on call of duty black opps cold war

Contents

The oft-heard catchphrase of Finance & Commerce reporter Bill Clements. (Example: "How're you doing?" "Oh, you know, bobbin' and weavin'.")

Notable bob and weave boxers

See also

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References

  1. "Boxing Masterclass - How to Bob and Weave". MightyFighter.com - Boxing Training | Fitness | Motivation. 2013-01-24. Retrieved 2017-12-21.
  2. "The Science of Mike Tyson and Elements of Peek-A-Boo: part II". SugarBoxing. 2014-02-01. Archived from the original on 2015-09-25. Retrieved 2014-05-07.

Chelsea Howard, 2017. Bloomsbury.