Rabbit punch

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A rabbit punch is a blow to the back of the head or to the base of the skull. [1] It is considered especially dangerous because it can damage the cervical vertebrae and subsequently the spinal cord, which may lead to serious and irreparable spinal cord injury. A rabbit punch can also detach the victim's brain from the brain stem, [2] which can kill instantly.

Contents

The punch's name is derived from the use of the technique by hunters to kill rabbits with a quick, sharp strike to the back of the head. [3]

Combat sports

The rabbit punch is illegal in boxing, [4] MMA, [5] and other combat sports [6] that involve striking. The only exceptions are no-holds-barred events such as the International Vale Tudo Championship (prior to rule changes in mid-2012). [7]

Amateur sports

On June 29, 2014, soccer referee John Bieniewicz was punched in the neck by Baseel Abdul Amir Saad, an upset player in an amateur match he was officiating in Livonia, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. Bieniewicz died two days later of his injuries, and Saad was charged with second-degree murder. [8] Bieniewicz's autopsy showed that the force of the impact on the left side of his neck just below the base of his skull had resulted in a rare injury with twisted and torn arteries around the base of his skull, knocking him out before he hit the ground. [9] In 2015, Saad pled guilty to manslaughter and received a sentence of 8 to 15 years in prison. [10]

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Peripheral nervous system Part of the nervous system

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Posterior cord syndrome

Posterior cord syndrome (PCS), also known as posterior spinal artery syndrome (PSA), is a type of incomplete spinal cord injury. PCS is the least commonly occurring of the six clinical spinal cord injury syndromes, with an incidence rate of less than 1%.

Central nervous system disease Disease of the brain or spinal cord

Central nervous system diseases, also known as central nervous system disorders, are a group of neurological disorders that affect the structure or function of the brain or spinal cord, which collectively form the central nervous system (CNS).

Neurological disorder Disease of anatomical entity that is located in the central nervous system or located in the peripheral nervous system

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Basilar invagination is invagination (infolding) of the base of the skull that occurs when the top of the C2 vertebra migrates upward. It can cause narrowing of the foramen magnum. It also may press on the lower brainstem.

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A sports-related traumatic brain injury is a serious accident which may lead to significant morbidity or mortality. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in sports are usually a result of physical contact with another person or stationary object, these sports may include boxing, gridiron football, field/ice hockey, lacrosse, martial arts, rugby, soccer, wrestling, auto racing, cycling, equestrian, roller blading, skateboarding, skiing, or snowboarding.

References

  1. Lee, Matthew. "What Is Rabbit Punching in Boxing?". AZCentral.
  2. "The medical effects of one punch on the human body". www.health.qld.gov.au. Queensland Health. 22 August 2017. Retrieved 24 November 2019.
  3. Langer, Richard. "Extract from "Grow it!"". www.motherearthnews.com. Archived from the original on 2004-05-01.
  4. Brown, Clifton (November 15, 2004). "Lots of Fighting, but Little Resolution for Boxing's Heavyweights". The New York Times .
  5. "NJ State Athletic Control Board – Proposed Rules – Rules Governing Boxing, Extreme Wrestling and Sparring Exhibitions and Performance Bond Procedure". Nj.gov. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  6. "USMTA Briefing on Muay Thai Rules for Competitive Fighters, 2006 – 2010 Edition" (pdf).
  7. "Sergio Batarelli's IVC to return – Mixed Martial Arts News". Mixedmartialarts.com. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  8. "Man accused of fatally punching Mich. referee due in court". Associated Press. July 30, 2014. Retrieved August 4, 2014.
  9. "Judge: Man should've known punch could kill soccer ref". Detroit Free Press . July 31, 2014. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  10. "Bassel Saad, Soccer Player, Sentenced in Killing of Referee". NBC Nightly News. NBC News. March 13, 2015. Retrieved 24 December 2018.