Bolo punch

Last updated
Bolo punch
Bolocolor.jpg
Bolo punch in Burmese boxing
Also known asFrance: Semi-circulaire

Serbia: Фрљотка

Romania: Semi-circulară

Thailand: Mat Wiyeng San

Burma: Wai Latt-di
Focus Striking
Creator Philippines

A bolo punch is a punch used in martial arts. The bolo punch is not among the traditional boxing punches (jab, uppercut, hook and cross).

Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practiced for a number of reasons such as self-defense; military and law enforcement applications; competition; physical, mental and spiritual development; and entertainment or the preservation of a nation's intangible cultural heritage.

Jab punch

A jab is a type of punch used in the martial arts. Several variations of the jab exist, but every jab shares these characteristics: while in a fighting stance, the lead fist is thrown straight ahead and the arm is fully extended from the side of the torso. This process also involves a quick turn of the torso. It is an overhand punch; at the moment of impact, the pronated fist is generally held in a horizontal orientation with the palm facing the ground.

Uppercut punch

The uppercut is a punch used in boxing that travels along a vertical line at the opponent's chin or solar plexus. It is, along with the cross, one of the two main punches that count in the statistics as power punches.

Bolo is a Filipino word for machete. The primary use for the bolo is clearing vegetation, however the bolo is also used in Filipino martial arts and is one of the main weapons trained in the martial art. After the United States defeated Spain in the Spanish–American War, they took over occupation of the Philippine Islands. Many Filipinos began emigrating to the United States, mostly California and Hawaii, as farm laborers. These immigrants were practitioners of the Filipino martial arts which included the boxing art known as Suntukan, Panantukan, and Pangamot. Many of these Filipino fighters gravitated towards the local sport boxing matches because they could earn more from one boxing match than working a week on the farms. Some used false names and traveled around so they could get around the boxing commission rules and fight more often without any restrictions. They would often use an unorthodox punch that the non-Filipino boxers had never seen before. It became known as the "bolo punch" because the movement was similar to swinging a bolo machete when working to cut down crops like sugar cane when working in the fields. [1] [ unreliable source? ]

Bolo knife large cutting tool of Filipino origin

A bolo is a large cutting tool of Filipino origin similar to the machete. It is used particularly in the Philippines, the jungles of Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei, as well as in the sugar fields of Cuba.

Spanish–American War Conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States

The Spanish–American War was an armed conflict between Spain and the United States in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. The war led to emergence of U.S. predominance in the Caribbean region, and resulted in U.S. acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions. That led to U.S. involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.

Suntukan is the fist-related striking component of Filipino martial arts.. In the central Philippine island region of Visayas, it is known as Pangamot or Pakamot. It is also known as Mano-mano and often referred to in Western martial arts circles of Inosanto lineage as Panantukan. Although it is also called Filipino Boxing, this article pertains to the Filipino martial art and should not be confused with the Western sport of boxing as practiced in the Philippines.

Ceferino Garcia is commonly referred to as the inventor of the bolo punch, though a 1924 article appearing in the Tacoma News-Tribune reported a Filipino boxer named Macario Flores to be using it. Garcia, Kid Gavilán, Sugar Ray Leonard and Pedro Carrasco are widely recognized as some of the best bolo punchers in boxing history. Roy Jones Jr. and Joe Calzaghe also use the bolo punch frequently.

Ceferino Garcia Filipino boxer

Ceferino Montano Garcia was a champion boxer born in Naval, Biliran, Philippines. He holds the most victories ever achieved by a Filipino boxer and is also the only boxer from the Philippines to become world champion in the middleweight division. Garcia is commonly credited to as the first well known user of the bolo punch, which was later popularized by Cuban fighter Kid Gavilán. He was inducted into the Ring Magazine Hall of Fame in 1977 and the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1989.

Kid Gavilán Cuban boxer

Gerardo González, better known in the boxing world as Kid Gavilan, was a World Welterweight Champion from Camagüey, Cuba. Boxing Writers Association of America named him Fighter of the Year in 1953, Gavilán was voted by The Ring magazine as the 26th greatest fighter of the last 80 years.

Sugar Ray Leonard American boxer

Ray Charles Leonard, best known as "Sugar" Ray Leonard, is an American former professional boxer, motivational speaker, and occasional actor. Often regarded as one of the greatest boxers of all time, he competed from 1977 to 1997, winning world titles in five weight divisions; the lineal championship in three weight divisions; as well as the undisputed welterweight title. Leonard was part of "The Fabulous Four", a group of boxers who all fought each other throughout the 1980s, consisting of himself, Roberto Durán, Thomas Hearns and Marvin Hagler.

When used in boxing, the bolo punch's range of motion is like that of a hook combined with an uppercut. As such, the punch should be thrown at 4–5 o'clock from an orthodox boxer's perspective. Its most important aspect is a circular motion performed with one arm to distract an opponent, causing the opponent to either take his eyes off the attacker's other arm or actually focus on the fighter's circling arm. When the opponent concentrates on the hand that is circling, the bolo puncher will usually sneak in a punch with the opposite hand. When the rival concentrates on the hand that is not moving, the bolo puncher will usually follow through with a full punch.

A counterpunch is a boxing punch that immediately follows an attack launched by an opponent. It exploits the opening created in an opponent's guard.

Three of the most famous cases of a fighter using the bolo punch were when Leonard avenged his loss to Roberto Durán in "The No Más Fight", when Leonard drew with Thomas Hearns in their second fight, and when Ike Ibeabuchi knocked out Chris Byrd with a left-handed bolo punch during their 1999 heavyweight contest.

Roberto Durán Panamanian boxer

Roberto Durán Samaniego is a Panamanian former professional boxer who competed from 1968 to 2001. He held world championships in four weight classes: lightweight, welterweight, light middleweight and middleweight, as well as reigns as the undisputed and lineal lightweight champion, and the lineal welterweight champion. He is also the second boxer to have competed over a span of five decades, the first being Jack Johnson. Durán was known as a versatile, technical brawler and pressure fighter, which earned him the nickname of "Manos de Piedra" for his formidable punching power and excellent defense.

Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns are considered to be two of the best boxers of all-time. They fought twice, with Leonard winning in 1981 and a draw in 1989. Both fights are considered to be classics.

Ikemefula Charles "Ike" Ibeabuchi is a Nigerian former professional boxer who competed from 1994 to 1999 in the heavyweight division. He defeated highly ranked contender David Tua in 1997 and future world champion Chris Byrd in 1999. After compiling a record of 20–0 with 15 knockouts, Ibeabuchi was imprisoned in Las Vegas in July 1999, after submitting an Alford plea.

Related Research Articles

Boxing combat sport

Boxing is a combat sport and blood sport in which two people, usually wearing protective gloves, throw punches at each other for a predetermined amount of time in a boxing ring.

Kickboxing group of stand-up combat sports based on kicking and punching

Kickboxing is a group of stand-up combat sports based on kicking and punching, historically developed from karate mixed with boxing. Kickboxing is practiced for self-defence, general fitness, or as a contact sport.

Muay Thai martial arts

Muay Thai or literally Thai boxing is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. This discipline is known as the "art of eight limbs" as it is characterized by the combined use of fists, elbows, knees, and shins. Muay Thai became widespread internationally in the late 20th to 21st century, when westernized practitioners from Thailand began competing in kickboxing, mixed rules matches, as well as matches under Muay Thai rules around the world. The professional league is governed by The Professional Boxing Association of Thailand (P.A.T) sanctioned by The Sports Authority of Thailand (SAT), and World Professional Muaythai Federation (WMF) overseas.

Punch (combat) striking blow with the closed fist

A punch is a striking blow with the fist.

Strike (attack) directed physical attack

A strike is a directed physical attack with either a part of the human body or with an inanimate object intended to cause blunt trauma or penetrating trauma upon an opponent.

Punching bag

A punching bag is a sturdy bag designed to be repeatedly punched. A punching bag is usually cylindrical, and filled with various materials of corresponding hardness.

<i>Boxing Legends of the Ring</i> 1993 boxing video game

Boxing Legends of the Ring is a boxing video game for the Mega Drive/Genesis and Super NES consoles. The boxers are represented by 2D sprites seen from over the shoulder of one of the fighters. The title of the game refers to the famous boxing magazine, The Ring, which the game is licensed to associate itself with. The following famous middleweight boxers are represented in the game: Sugar Ray Leonard, Roberto Durán, Thomas Hearns, James Toney, Marvin Hagler, Jake LaMotta, Sugar Ray Robinson, and Rocky Graziano.

Lethwei unarmed Burmese martial art

Lethwei or Burmese bareknuckle boxing is a full contact combat sport from Myanmar that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. Lethwei is considered to be one of the most aggressive and brutal martial arts in the world, because the fighters fight bareknuckle with only the use of tape and gauze on their hands. The use of fists, elbows, knees, and feet, but more surprisingly, the head makes it a very unusual martial art. Although disallowed in many combat sports, in Lethwei, the use of headbutt is encouraged. This is the reason it also known as "The Art of 9 Limbs".

Christopher Cornelius "Chris" Byrd is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1993 to 2009. He is a two-time world heavyweight champion, having first won the WBO title in 2000 after an upset corner stoppage over then-undefeated Vitali Klitschko. In his first title defense later that year, he lost to Vitali's brother Wladimir Klitschko. In 2002, Byrd defeated Evander Holyfield to win the IBF heavyweight title for his second reign as world champion. He made four successful defenses until losing his title again to Wladimir Klitschko in a 2006 rematch. Byrd's cousin, Lamon Brewster, has a shared history with Wladimir Klitschko: Brewster defeated him in 2004, but lost in a 2007 rematch.

Hook (boxing) punch in boxing, performed by turning the core muscles and back, thereby swinging the arm, which is bent at an angle near or at 90 degrees, in a horizontal arc into the opponent; usually aimed at the jaw or (less often) the liver

A hook is a punch in boxing. It is performed by turning the core muscles and back, thereby swinging the arm, which is bent at an angle near or at 90 degrees, in a horizontal arc into the opponent. A hook is usually aimed at the jaw, but it can also be used for body shots, especially to the liver.

<i>The Art of Self Defense</i> (1941 film) 1941 animated film by Jack Kinney

The Art of Self Defense is a cartoon made by the Walt Disney Company in 1941.

Clinch fighting

Clinch fighting is the part of stand-up fighting where the combatants are grappling in a clinch, typically using clinch holds. Clinching the opponent can be used to eliminate the opponent's effective usage of some kicks, punches, and melee weapons. The clinch can also be used as a medium to switch from stand-up fighting to ground fighting by using takedowns, throws or sweeps.

Footwork (martial arts)

Footwork is a martial arts and combat sports term for the general usage of the legs and feet in stand-up fighting. Footwork involves keeping balance, closing or furthering the distance, controlling spatial positioning, and/or creating additional momentum for strikes.

Peek-a-boo is a boxing style which received its common name for the defensive hands position, which are normally placed in front of the boxer's face, like in the baby's game of the same name. It offers extra protection to the face and makes it easier to jab the opponent's face. Peek-a-boo boxing was developed by legendary trainer Cus D'Amato, who didn't call it that way though.

Boxing styles and technique

Throughout the history of gloved boxing styles, techniques and strategies have changed to varying degrees. Ring conditions, promoter demands, teaching techniques, and the influence of successful boxers are some of the reasons styles and strategies have fluctuated.

One-two combo

In boxing, the "one-two combo" is the name given to the combination consisting of two common punches found in boxing - a jab followed by the cross. In boxing parlance, fundamental punches are commonly assigned numbers by trainers and in this case there is the jab (#1) and the cross (#2).

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-05-26. Retrieved 2015-04-29.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)