Jab

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Jab
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Also known as Flag of Albania.svg Albanian: Direkt

Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil: Direto

Flag of Myanmar.svg Burmese: Pyon Latt-di

Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Chinese: 前手直拳/ 刺拳

Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czech: Direkt

Flag of the Netherlands.svg Dutch: Directe

Flag of Estonia.svg Estonian: Sirge

Flag of France.svg French: Direct (bras avant)

Flag of Germany.svg German: Gerade

Flag of Israel.svg Hebrew: ישרה

Flag of Italy.svg Italian: Diretto

Flag of Japan.svg Japanese: Kizami zuki / Jun zuki (Choku zuki)

Flag of Poland.svg Polish: Prosty

Flag of Romania.svg Romanian: Directă (braţ faţă)

Flag of Russia.svg Russian:Джеб

Flag of Serbia.svg Serbian: Предњи директ (кец)

Flag of Thailand.svg Thai: Mat Trong Say (หมัด ตรง ซ้าย)

Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnamese: Đấm quai hàm.
Focus Striking

A jab is a type of punch used in the martial arts. Several variations of the jab exist, but every jab shares these characteristics: while in a fighting stance, the lead fist is thrown straight ahead and the arm is fully extended from the side of the torso. This process also involves a quick turn of the torso. It is an overhand punch; at the moment of impact, the pronated fist is generally held in a horizontal orientation with the palm facing the ground.

Contents

Etymology

The word jab was first used in 1825, to mean "to thrust with a point." The term is a Scottish variant of the word job, which means "to strike, pierce, thrust." [1]

Uses

Defense

A jab is an integral part of a fighter's defense. Its speed and power of execution and reach can keep the opponent at a distance, preventing him from charging in. Defensive jabs can be employed while moving backwards.

Speed jab

This jab gives a fighter high mobility and is often used with the intention of scoring points. Fighters use this variation of the jab when they want to preserve the mobility and balance of their stance.

Rangefinding jab

Used in order to establish a feeling for distance, the rangefinding jab is often used to set up a power punch with the other hand. Thus it can help conserve stamina and lower the risk of being countered by allowing the fighter to commit his stronger hand only when he is within proper range.

Boxers have been wobbled by a rangefinding jab. [2]

Power jab

Power can be added to a jab if it is thrown with a moderate step forward. The drawback to this technique is that it takes the fighter out of his boxing stance, committing him to the punch rather more than the speed jab. A "pivot jab" is the most powerful jab, one in which the weight shifts almost entirely to the lead foot, which pivots to put the mass of the body behind the punch. Jabbing from the hip, rather than from a tight guard, will add power to the jab at the expense of speed. [3]

Jab to the body

Jabbing to the body is relatively uncommon, because it increases a fighter's vulnerability to a counterpunch. Typically, the fighter bends at the waist and fires a speed jab to the midsection of his opponent in an attempt at getting the opponent to drop his guard. It is impractical to put the body weight behind this punch, so power is limited. The jab to the body can be used effectively to counter the opponents lead jab.

Jab combinations


Historians consider some of the best jabbers in history to be Sonny Liston, Larry Holmes, Muhammad Ali, Hector Camacho, and Sugar Ray Leonard. Recent master jabbers include Lennox Lewis and Wladimir Klitschko, both coached by the same trainer and able to develop significant power into their jabs. Holmes' jab has often been called "the best among Heavyweights",[ citation needed ] Ali's jab was famous for its speed [4] and Liston's for its power. [5] Mike Tyson used a rare version of a slip jab, that allowed him to jab effectively against taller opponents with longer reach. [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Kickboxing Stand-up combat sports

Kickboxing is a stand-up combat sport based on kicking and punching, historically developed from karate mixed with boxing. Kickboxing is practiced for self-defence, general fitness, or as a contact sport.

Muay Thai Combat sport of Thailand (lit. "Thai boxing")

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Sonny Liston American boxer

Charles L. "Sonny" Liston was an American professional boxer who competed from 1953 to 1970.

Wladimir Klitschko Ukrainian boxer

Wladimir Wladimirowitsch Klitschko is a Ukrainian former professional boxer who competed from 1996 to 2017. He held the world heavyweight championship twice, including the WBA (Super), IBF, WBO, IBO, and Ring magazine titles. A strategic and intelligent boxer, Klitschko is considered to be one of the best heavyweight champions of all time. He was known for his exceptional knockout power, using a strong jab, straight right hand and left hook, as well as great footwork and mobility, unusual for boxers of his size.

Cross (boxing)

In boxing, a cross is a punch usually thrown with the dominant hand the instant an opponent leads with his opposite hand. The blow crosses over the leading arm, hence its name. It is a power punch like the uppercut and hook. Compubox, a computerized punch scoring system, counts the cross as a power punch.

Strike (attack) Directed physical attack

A strike is a directed physical attack with either a part of the human body or with an inanimate object intended to cause blunt trauma or penetrating trauma upon an opponent.

Hook (boxing)

A hook is a punch in boxing. It is performed by turning the core muscles and back, thereby swinging the arm, which is bent at an angle near or at 90 degrees, in a horizontal arc into the opponent. A hook is usually aimed at the jaw, but it can also be used for body shots, especially to the liver.

Punching power

Punching power is the amount of kinetic energy in a person's punches. Knockout power is a similar concept relating to the probability of any strike to the head to cause unconsciousness or a strike to the body that renders an opponent unable to continue fighting. Knockout power is related to the force delivered, the timing, the technique, precision of the strike, among other factors.

Footwork (martial arts)

Footwork is a martial arts and combat sports term for the general usage of the legs and feet in stand-up fighting. Footwork involves keeping balance, closing or furthering the distance, controlling spatial positioning, and/or creating additional momentum for strikes.

Peek-a-boo is a boxing style which received its common name for the defensive hands position, which are normally placed in front of the boxer's face, like in the baby's game of the same name. The technique is thought to offer extra protection to the face whilst making it easier to jab the opponent's face. The fighter holds their gloves close to their cheeks and pulls their arms tight against their torso. A major proponent of the style was trainer Cus D'Amato, who didn't use the term peek-a-boo and instead referred to it as a "tight defense." The style was criticized by some because it was believed that an efficient attack could not be launched from it.

Boxing styles and technique

Throughout the history of gloved boxing styles, techniques and strategies have changed to varying degrees. Ring conditions, promoter demands, teaching techniques, and the influence of successful boxers are some of the reasons styles and strategies have fluctuated.

<i>Foes of Ali</i> 1995 boxing video game

Foes of Ali is a boxing video game that was developed by Gray Matter and published by EA Sports in 1995. It was released exclusively for the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer console. It was one of the first boxing games to render matches using 3D graphics. Thus, boxers in the game could be shown to move 360 degrees around the ring in a more convincing fashion than had previously been possible using 2D sprites. The gameplay bears many similarities to that featured in 4D Sports Boxing.

Orthodox stance Way of positioning the feet and hands in combat sports

In combat sports such as boxing, an orthodox stance is one in which the boxer places their left foot farther in front of the right foot, thus having their weaker side closer to the opponent. Because it favors the stronger, dominant side—often the right side, see laterality—the orthodox stance is the most common stance in boxing and MMA. It is mostly used by right-handed boxers. Many boxing champions, such as Jack Johnson, Anthony Joshua, Deontay Wilder, Marco Antonio Barrera, Evander Holyfield, Rocky Marciano, Ingmar Johansson, Roberto Durán, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Sugar Ray Robinson, Muhammad Ali, Amir Khan, Jay Bobby, Johnny Tapia, Mike Tyson, Larry Holmes, Lennox Lewis, Joseph Parker, Vitali Klitschko, Wladimir Klitschko, Maguila,Canelo Álvarez and Tyson Fury, have fought in an orthodox stance.

Southpaw stance

In boxing and some other sports, a southpaw stance is where the boxer has their right hand and right foot forward, leading with right jabs, and following with a left cross right hook. It is the normal stance for a left-handed boxer. The corresponding boxing designation for a right-handed boxer is orthodox and is generally a mirror-image of the southpaw stance. In American English, "southpaw" generally refers to a person who is left handed.

One-two combo

In boxing, the "one-two combo" is the name given to the combination consisting of two common punches found in boxing – a jab followed by the cross. In boxing parlance, fundamental punches are commonly assigned numbers by trainers and in this case there is the jab (#1) and the cross (#2).

Uppercut

The uppercut is a punch used in boxing that travels along a vertical line at the opponent's chin or solar plexus. It is, along with the cross, one of the two main punches that count in the statistics as power punches.

Wladimir Klitschko vs. Tyson Fury Boxing competition

Wladimir Klitschko vs. Tyson Fury, billed as Kollisionskurs, was a professional boxing match contested for the WBA (Super), WBO, IBF, IBO, The Ring magazine, and lineal heavyweight titles. The fight took place on November 27, 2015 at Esprit Arena, Düsseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. Fury was declared the winner by unanimous decision. This ended Klitschko's reign of nearly 10 years, the second longest in heavyweight history. Klitschko was entitled to a rematch per the fight contract. Despite this, Fury was stripped of the IBF heavyweight title for agreeing to the rematch instead of facing the IBF mandatory challenger, Vyacheslav Glazkov.

Boxing career of Muhammad Ali Boxing career of Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali is widely regarded by boxing commentators and historians as one of the greatest professional boxers of all time. BoxRec ranks Ali as the fourteenth greatest boxer, pound for pound, of all time with 716.4 points. He is the highest ranked fighter to have only faced heavyweights during his professional career. Boxing magazine The Ring named him number one in a 1998 ranking of greatest heavyweights from all eras. In 1999, The Associated Press voted Ali the number one heavyweight of the 20th century. In 1999, Ali was named the second greatest boxer in history, pound for pound, by ESPN; behind only welterweight and middleweight legend Sugar Ray Robinson. In December 2007, ESPN listed Ali second in its choice of the greatest heavyweights of all time, behind Joe Louis.

References

  1. "Jab". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  2. "Vitali Klitschko vs. Tamasz Adamek". Abload GIF. Retrieved October 12, 2012.
  3. Johnny N (June 30, 2010). "The 5 Types of Jabs". ExpertBoxing.com. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  4. "The Boxer". 2012 Muhammad Ali Enterprises LLC. Archived from the original on May 12, 2012. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  5. "East Side Boxing". East side Boxing. Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  6. Vasquez, Ricardo (June 22, 2016). "The Science of Mike Tyson and Elements of Peek-A-Boo: part II (jab section)". SugarBoxing.com. Archived from the original on September 25, 2015. Retrieved July 30, 2014.