Sparring

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Tommy Burns during a sparring session Tommy Burns sparring.jpg
Tommy Burns during a sparring session

Sparring is a form of training common to many combat sports. Although the precise form varies, it is essentially relatively 'free-form' fighting, with enough rules, customs, or agreements to minimize injuries. By extension, argumentative debate is sometimes called warring

Training Acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of teaching

Training is teaching, or developing in oneself or others, any skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies. Training has specific goals of improving one's capability, capacity, productivity and performance. It forms the core of apprenticeships and provides the backbone of content at institutes of technology. In addition to the basic training required for a trade, occupation or profession, observers of the labor-market recognize as of 2008 the need to continue training beyond initial qualifications: to maintain, upgrade and update skills throughout working life. People within many professions and occupations may refer to this sort of training as professional development.

Aliveness (martial arts)

Aliveness, also referred to as alive training describes martial arts training methods that are spontaneous, non-scripted, and dynamic. Alive training is performed with the intent to challenge or defeat rather than to demonstrate. Aliveness has also been defined in relation to martial arts techniques as an evaluation of combat effectiveness.

Customs authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting customs duties and for controlling the flow of goods

Customs” means the Government Service which is responsible for the administration of Customs law and the collection of duties and taxes and which also has the responsibility for the application of other laws and regulations relating to the importation, exportation, movement or storage of goods.

Contents

Differences between styles

The physical nature of sparring naturally varies with the nature of the skills it is intended to develop; sparring in a striking art such as Chun Kuk Do will normally begin with the players at opposite sides of the ring and will be given a point for striking the appropriate area and will be given a foul for striking an inappropriate area or stepping out of the ring. Sparring in a grappling art such as judo might begin with the partners holding one another and end if they separate.

Strike (attack) directed physical attack

A strike is a directed physical attack with either a part of the human body or with an inanimate object intended to cause blunt trauma or penetrating trauma upon an opponent.

Chun Kuk Do, or Chuck Norris System, is a Korean hybrid martial art style founded by American martial artist Chuck Norris. Chunkukdo is a very hard style of full-contact karate

Grappling range of techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts

In hand-to-hand combat, grappling is a close fighting technique used to gain a physical advantage such as improving relative position, or causing injury to the opponent. Grappling covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for self-defense.

The organization of sparring matches also varies; if the participants know each other well and are friendly, it may be sufficient for them to simply play, without rules, referee, or timer. If the sparring is between strangers, there is some emotional tension, or if the sparring is being evaluated, it may be appropriate to introduce formal rules and have an experienced martial artist supervise or referee the match.

A WTF taekwondo sparring match WTF Taekwondo 1.jpg
A WTF taekwondo sparring match

In some schools, permission to begin sparring is granted upon entry. The rationale for this decision is that students must learn how to deal with a fast, powerful, and determined attacker. In other schools, students may be required to wait a few months, for safety reasons, [1] because they must first build the skills they would ideally employ in their sparring practice.

Sparring is normally distinct from fights in competition, the goal of sparring normally being the education of the participants.

Use and sport

The educational role of sparring is a matter of some debate. In any sparring match, precautions of some sort must be taken to protect the participants. These may include wearing protective gear, declaring certain techniques and targets off-limits, playing slowly or at a fixed speed, forbidding certain kinds of trickery, or one of many other possibilities. These precautions have the potential to change the nature of the skill that is being learned. For example, if one were to always spar with heavily padded gloves, one might come to rely on techniques that risk breaking bones in one's hand. Many schools recognize this problem but value sparring nonetheless because it forces the student to improvise, to think under pressure, and to keep their emotions under control.

The level of contact is also debated, lighter contact may lead to less injuries but hard contact may better prepare individuals for competition or self-defense. Some sport styles, such as sanda, taekwondo, tang soo do, Kyokushin kaikan, kūdō, karate, kendo, and mixed martial arts use full contact sparring.[ citation needed ]

Self-defense countermeasure that involves defending oneself, ones property, or the well-being of another from harm

Self-defense is a countermeasure that involves defending the health and well-being of oneself from harm. The use of the right of self-defense as a legal justification for the use of force in times of danger is available in many jurisdictions.

Sanshou , also known as Sanda , Chinese boxing or Chinese kickboxing, is a Chinese self-defense system and combat sport. Wushu Sanshou is a martial art which was originally developed by the Chinese military based upon the study and practices of traditional Kung fu and modern combat fighting techniques; it combines full-contact kickboxing, which includes close range and rapid successive punches and kicks, with wrestling, takedowns, throws, sweeps, kick catches, and in some competitions, even elbow and knee strikes.

Taekwondo martial art from Korea

Taekwondo is a Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu sparring is full contact and injuries are rare as it does not involve striking but rather forcing the opponent to submit using grappling techniques.

MMA

There is a lot of controversy in mixed martial arts about the benefits of full contact sparring vs career threatening injuries. Former Ultimate Fighting Championship fighter Jamie Varner came to an early retirement because he had a lot of head trauma in full contact sparring. [2]

Mixed martial arts full contact combat sport

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows striking and grappling, both standing and on the ground, using techniques from various combat sports and martial arts. The first documented use of the term mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg in 1993. The term gained popularity when newfullcontact.com, then one of the largest websites covering the sport, hosted and republished the article. The question of who actually coined the term is subject to debate.

Ultimate Fighting Championship mixed martial arts promotion

The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is an American mixed martial arts promotion company based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that is owned and operated by parent company William Morris Endeavor. It is the largest MMA promotion company in the world and features the highest-level fighters on the roster. The UFC produces events worldwide that showcase twelve weight divisions and abide by the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. As of 2018, the UFC has held over 400 events. Dana White serves as the president of the UFC. White has held that position since 2001; while under his stewardship, the UFC has grown into a globally popular multi-billion-dollar enterprise.

UFC former welterweight champions Robbie Lawler and Johny Hendricks don't do full contact sparring. [3]

Names and types

Sparring has different names and different forms in various schools. Some schools prefer not to call it sparring, as they feel it differs in kind from what is normally called sparring.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners 'Rolling' Half guard in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.jpg
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners 'Rolling'

Related Research Articles

Karate martial art

Karate (空手) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom. It developed from the indigenous Ryukyuan martial arts under the influence of Chinese Kung Fu, particularly Fujian White Crane. Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open-hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands and palm-heel strikes. Historically, and in some modern styles, grappling, throws, joint locks, restraints and vital-point strikes are also taught. A karate practitioner is called a karateka (空手家).

Martial arts codified systems and traditions of combat practices

Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practiced for a number of reasons such as self-defense, military and law enforcement applications, physical, mental and spiritual development; as well as entertainment and the preservation of a nation's intangible cultural heritage.

Brazilian jiu-jitsu martial art focusing on grappling and ground fighting, originally based on Kodokan judo newaza taught by Japanese judoka, that developed independently in Brazil from experimentation and adaptation by Carlos and Hélio Gracie, Luiz França, etc.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a martial art and combat sport system that focuses on grappling with particular emphasis on ground fighting. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was developed from Kodokan judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught by a number of Japanese individuals including Takeo Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda, Soshihiro Satake, and Isao Okano. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu eventually came to be its own defined combat sport through the innovations, practices, and adaptation of judo.

Shotokan

Shotokan is a style of karate, developed from various martial arts by Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) and his son Gigo (Yoshitaka) Funakoshi (1906–1945). Gichin was born in Okinawa and is widely credited with popularizing "karate do" through a series of public demonstrations, and by promoting the development of university karate clubs, including those at Keio, Waseda, Hitotsubashi (Shodai), Takushoku, Chuo, Gakushuin, and Hosei.

Full contact karate is any format of karate where competitors spar full-contact and allow a knockout as winning criterion

Kumite

Kumite (組手) literally translated means "grappling hands" and is one of the three main sections of karate training, along with kata and kihon. Kumite is the part of karate in which a person trains against an adversary, using the techniques learned from the kihon and kata.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to martial arts:

Submission wrestling

Submission wrestling or combat wrestling, is a form of competition and a general term for martial arts and combat sports that focus on clinch and ground fighting with the aim of obtaining a submission through the use of submission holds. The term "submission wrestling" usually refers only to the form of competition and training that does not use a gi, or "combat kimono", of the sort often worn with belts that establish rank by color, though some may use the loose trousers of such a uniform, without the jacket.

International Taekwon-Do Federation voluntary association

International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF) is an international taekwondo organization founded on March 22, 1966, by General Choi Hong Hi in Seoul, South Korea. The ITF was founded to promote and encourage the growth of the Korean martial art of Taekwon-Do.

Combat sport sport

A combat sport, or fighting sport, is a competitive contact sport that usually involves one-on-one combat. In many combat sports, a contestant wins by scoring more points than the opponent or by disabling the opponent. Common combat sports include mixed martial arts, boxing, wrestling, fencing, savate, kickboxing, Muay Thai, Sanda, Tae Kwon Do, Capoeira, Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, HMB, Sambo, Kyokushin, and Kūdō, sometimes even Ninjutsu.

Tang Soo Do Korean martial art

Tang Soo Do is a karate-based Korean martial art incorporating fighting principles from subak, as well as northern Chinese martial arts. The techniques of what is commonly known as Tang Soo Do combine elements of shotokan karate, subak, taekkyon, and kung fu.

Front kick kick

The front kick in martial arts is a kick executed by lifting the knee straight forward, while keeping the foot and shin either hanging freely or pulled to the hip, and then straightening the leg in front of the practitioner and striking the target area. It is desirable to retract the leg immediately after delivering the kick, to avoid the opponent trying to grapple the leg and to return to stable fighting stance.

Stand-up fighting

In martial arts and combat sports, stand-up fighting is hand-to-hand combat between opponents in a standing position, as distinguished from ground fighting. Clinch fighting is stand-up grappling. Fighters employ striking, including striking combinations, using either body parts or mêlée weapons, to incapacitate or injure the opponent. Combatants use blocking techniques to block the opponent's attacks.

Erik Paulson is an American mixed martial artist. He is the first American to win the World Light-Heavy Weight Shooto Title in Japan.

The Dog Brothers are a group of martial artists that have gained notoriety in the Filipino Martial Arts community for the group's annual "Gathering of the Pack" collectives. These collectives feature dangerous weapon-based sparring matches that they have copyrighted as "Real Contact Stickfighting".

Kūdō modern form of martial art created in 1981 by Takashi Azuma

Kūdō is a Japanese hybrid martial art. It is full-contact mixed combat sport with head Guard and gloves, throwing and grappling techniques are also allowed in the competition, including restraint, locks and strangle holds. It can be called a mixed martial art with protective gear for the head

References

  1. "Why Are White Belt Fighters So Dangerous?".
  2. Hauser, Steve (24 March 2015). "Former UFC fighter Jamie Varner warns young fighters: Too much sparring can lead to early retirement". Bloody Elbow. Retrieved 10 August 2017.
  3. Matthew Ryder (16 March 2014). "Johny Hendricks vs. Robbie Lawler: How Safe Sparring May Change Contact Sports". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 10 August 2017.
  4. Stewart, John (Nov 1980), "Kumite: A Learning Experience", Black Belt magazine : 28–34, 91