Brisbane City Council

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Brisbane City Council
Brisbane City Council.svg
City council overview
Formed30 October 1924;97 years ago (1924-10-30) [1]
Jurisdiction Brisbane, Australia
EmployeesIncrease2.svg 8,233 (2019) [2] [3]
Annual budgetIncrease2.svgA$$4 billion (2022-23) [4]
City council executives
  • Adrian Schrinner, Lord Mayor of Brisbane [5]
  • Krista Adams, Deputy Mayor of Brisbane [6]
  • Colin Jensen, Chief Executive Officer [7]
  • Ainsley Gold, Executive Officer [7]
Key document
Website brisbane.qld.gov.au

Brisbane City Council (BCC) is the democratic executive local government authority for the City of Brisbane, the capital city of the state of Queensland, Australia. The largest City Council in Australia by population and area, BCC's jurisdiction includes 26 wards and 27 elected councillors covering 1338km2. [note 1] [9] [5] BCC is overseen by the Lord Mayor of Brisbane, Adrian Schrinner, and the Council of Brisbane (all councillors of the City of Brisbane) and the Civic Cabinet (Councillors that chair one of eight standing committees within BCC). [6] The Council's CEO is Colin Jensen, supported by EO Ainsley Gold. [7]

Contents

Strategy

Brisbane City Council is guided by two core future planning documents: Brisbane's Future Blueprint (infrastructure, cultural, and capital works projects), and Brisbane Vision 2031 (corporate and city planning). Council also does more frequent but smaller scale community consultations through the Your City Your Say platform. [10]

Brisbane Future Blueprint

Brisbane's Future Blueprint is a community-developed document, released in June 2018, outlining what the City Council's goals should be. One in five households in Brisbane, representing every suburb, responded to the community consultation, totalling over 100,000 responses. More than 15,000 unique suggestions to improve Brisbane were put forward. The Blueprint provides for eight principles and 40 specific actions to make Brisbane a "friendly and liveable city": [11]

  1. Create a city of neighbourhoods
  2. Protect and create greenspace
  3. Create more to see and do
  4. Protect the Brisbane backyard and our unique character
  5. Ensure best practice design that complements the character of Brisbane
  6. Empower and engage residents
  7. Get people home quicker and safer with more travel options
  8. Give people more choice when it comes to housing

Brisbane Vision 2031

Brisbane Vision 2031 is the City Council's long-term plan for developing Brisbane City. It outlines an additional eight principles to consider in developing Council policy and supplements the City Council's Corporate Plan 2016-17 and 2020-21. [12]

Structure

Lord Mayor

The Lord Mayorof Brisbane holds a role as the Chief "Elected" Executive of the Brisbane City Council, parallel to the role of the Chief Executive Officer, which is held by a civilian employee of the Council. The Lord Mayor has a four-year term between elections, coinciding with general councillor elections. [13] The current Lord Mayor of Brisbane is Adrian Schrinner of the Liberal National Party, supported by Krista Adams, the Deputy Mayor. [5] [6]

Council of Brisbane and the Civic Cabinet

The Council of Brisbane is the high-level administrative board of the City Council, composed of all elected councillors in the City of Brisbane. There are 27 councillors, 26 from electoral wards in Brisbane and the Lord Mayor. [9] The Civic Cabinet, otherwise known as the Establishment and Coordination Committee, manages the Council's day-to-day tasks, and acts as a Board of Directors-style caucus. It is composed of the Chairs of Council's seven other standing committees:

Generally, the Lord Mayor is also the Chair of the Establishment and Coordination Committee, and as a result, is the Chair and member of the Civic Cabinet as well. [6] Each Committee works alongside its relevant organisational divisions to "consider Council policy, provide advice to Council and delivers results for the people of Brisbane." [14]

Organisational divisions

Within BCC, there are six different organisational divisions representing the core tasks of the Council. Each division had its own Divisional Manager, who is accountable to the Council of Brisbane, the Civil Cabinet, and the CEO/EO. As of April 2020, the six divisions and their managers are:

These divisions are organisational, meaning that they're not subject to the changes in the elected administration nor are elected themselves. [7]

History

Pre-1900s

1900s

2000s

See also

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References

  1. "City of Brisbane Act 1924". Australasian Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 22 May 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. "2018-2019 Annual Report" (PDF). Brisbane City Council. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 January 2021. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  3. "2017-2018 Annual Report" (PDF). Brisbane City Council. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  4. "Brisbane announces steep rates hike on Airbnb accommodation to tackle rental crisis". ABC News. 14 June 2022.
  5. 1 2 3 "Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner". Brisbane City Council. 12 February 2020. Archived from the original on 13 February 2020. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 "Know Your Civic Cabinet" (PDF). Brisbane City Council. April 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 31 August 2020. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  7. 1 2 3 4 "Organisational chart". Brisbane City Council. 11 May 2020. Retrieved 22 May 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. "City of Brisbane Act 2010". Queensland Legislation. 30 March 2020. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  9. 1 2 "Councillors and wards". Brisbane City Council. 24 April 2020. Archived from the original on 31 May 2019. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  10. "Your City Your Say". Brisbane City Council. 18 May 2020. Archived from the original on 31 May 2019. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  11. "Brisbane's Future Blueprint". Brisbane City Council. 3 March 2020. Archived from the original on 20 March 2020. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  12. "Brisbane Vision 2031". Brisbane City Council. 27 November 2019. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  13. Sansom, Graham (September 2012). "Australian Mayors: What Can and Should They Do?" (PDF). UTS: Centre for Local Government. Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 April 2017. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
  14. "Council committees". Brisbane City Council. 24 April 2020. Archived from the original on 6 April 2020. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
  15. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "History of Brisbane". Visit Brisbane. Archived from the original on 28 April 2015. Retrieved 31 May 2020.
  16. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Council history". Brisbane City Council. 14 May 2019. Archived from the original on 31 May 2019. Retrieved 31 May 2020.

Notes

  1. This is not to say that Brisbane itself is the largest city in Australia (which is Sydney). Most other cities have a "City of xyz Council" that only covers that city's CBD unlike Brisbane, which covers all surrounding suburbs. Hence, BCC had an abnormally large population count simply because the population lies within one city council area.