Chosan County

Last updated
Chosan County
초산군
County
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja楚山郡
  McCune-ReischauerCh'osan kun
  Revised RomanizationChosan-gun
DPRK2006 Chagang-Chosan.PNG
Map of Chagang showing the location of Chosan
Country North Korea
Province Chagang Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 18 ri
Area
  Total550 km2 (210 sq mi)
Population (1990 est.)
  Total33,600

Ch'osan County is a kun, or county, in Chagang province, North Korea. It borders the People's Republic of China to the north.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

The terrain slopes downward from the Kangnam Mountains in the south to the Yalu River in the north. The highest peak is Namhaetaesan (남해태산, 1,079 m). Some 20% of the land is arable, with animal husbandry and beekeeping playing important roles. 76.1% of the land is forested, and thus logging also contributes to the local economy.

Kangnam Mountains mountain in North Korea

The Kangnam Mountains are a mountain range of North Korea, in the central part of the country's northern region. They run parallel to the Amnok River which forms the border with China. They lie west of the Rangrim Mountains, which is the drainage divide between northwestern and northeastern Korea.

Yalu River river on the border between North Korea and China

The Yalu River, also called the Amrok River or Amnok River, is a river on the border between North Korea and China. Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.

Logging the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto transport vehicles

Logging is the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto trucks or skeleton cars.

The climate is continental, with hot summers and cold winters. The highest temperature recorded in North Korea, 41 °C, was recorded in the county in July 1961. [1]

During the Korean War on October 26, 1950, Republic of Korea forces reached the Yalu River at Chosan, shortly before the massive Chinese counterattack.

Korean War 1950–1953 war between North Korea and South Korea

The Korean War was a war between North Korea and South Korea. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border.

South Korea Republic in East Asia

South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (ROK), is a country in East Asia, constituting the southern part of the Korean Peninsula and lying to the east of the Asian mainland. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. South Korea lies in the north temperate zone and has a predominantly mountainous terrain. It comprises an estimated 51.4 million residents distributed over 100,363 km2 (38,750 sq mi). Its capital and largest city is Seoul, with a population of around 10 million.

The Chosan Revolutionary Site is associated with Kim Hyong-jik. He visited Chosan several times and met with members of the Korean National Association. The site includes the Paesin School. [2]

Kim Hyong-jik father of Kim Il-sung

Kim Hyŏng-jik was a Korean independence activist. He was the father of North Korean founder Kim Il-sung, grandfather of Kim Jong-il, and great-grandfather of the current leader of North Korea, Kim Jong-un.

Korean National Association Korean-American political organization

The Korean National Association, also known as All Korea Korean National Association, was a political organization established on February 1, 1909, to fight Japan's colonial policies and occupation in Korea. It was founded in San Francisco by the intellectual scholar and Korean Independence activist Ahn Changho, and represented the interests of Koreans in the United States, Russian Far East, and Manchuria during the Korean Independence Movement.

In 1999, a complex of Koguryo tombs was excavated in Chosan. [3]

Goguryeo Former kingdom of Korea

Goguryeo, also called Goryeo, was a Korean kingdom located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula and the southern and central parts of Manchuria. Along with Baekje and Silla, Goguryeo was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. It was an active participant in the power struggle for control of the Korean peninsula and was also associated with the foreign affairs of neighboring polities in China and Japan.

Administrative divisions

Ch'osan County is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 18 ri (villages):

  • Ch'osan-ŭp
  • Angt'o-ri
  • Changt'o-ri
  • Ching-ri
  • Chungsang-ri
  • Hasil-li
  • Hwagŏl-li
  • Kup'yŏng-ri
  • Kuryong-ri
  • Risal-li
  • Ryongsang-ri
  • Ryŏnp'ung-ri
  • Sinyangsong-ri
  • Song'ul-li
  • Such'im-ri
  • Unp'yŏng-ri
  • Wail-li
  • Yŏn'u-ri

See also

Related Research Articles

Ryongchon County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Ryongch'ŏn County is a kun (county) in North P'yǒngan province, North Korea, at the mouth of the Yalu River. The county seat is Ryongch'ŏn-ŭp, about 20 kilometres (12 mi) from the border with China. The area has a reported population of 27,000 and is a centre of chemical and metalworking production.

Hoeryong Municipal City in North Hamgyong Province, North Korea

Hoeryŏng is a city in North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea. It is located opposite Jilin Province, China, with the Tumen River in between. Sanhe (三合鎮), in Longjing City, is the closest Chinese town across the river. Hoeryŏng is claimed to be the birthplace of Kim Il Sung's first wife and Kim Jong Il's mother, Kim Jong Suk. The Hoeryong Revolutionary Site commemorates the birthplace.

Kimhyongjik County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Kimhyŏngjik County is a kun of Ryanggang Province, North Korea. Formerly known as Huch'ang County, it was renamed in 1988 after Kim Il Sung's father, Kim Hyŏng-jik.

Changjin County is a mountainous county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea.

Kimjongsuk County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Kimjŏngsuk County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang province, North Korea, along the Yalu River. Originally part of Samsu, the county was made a separate entity in 1952. Formerly known as Sinpa, it was named in 1981 after Kim Jong-suk, the mother of Kim Jong-il.

Samsu County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Samsu County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang province, North Korea. Prior to 1954, it was part of South Hamgyŏng province.

Taehongdan County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Taehongdan County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang province, North Korea. It was originally part of Musan County.

Kopung County County in Chagang Province, North Korea

Kop'ung County is a kun, or county, in Chagang province, North Korea. Prior to the division of Korea, it was part of Chosan county.

Chunggang County County in Chagang Province, North Korea

Chunggang County is a kun, or county, in northern Chagang province, North Korea. It was originally part of Huchang county in Ryanggang, and for that reason older sources still identify it as being part of Huchang. The county seat was originally known as Chunggangjin (중강진), but is now known as Chunggang ŭp. Chunggang looks across the Yalu River at China, and borders Ryanggang province to the south.

Sijung County County in Chagang Province, North Korea

Sijung County is a kun, or county, in Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Kanggye and Changgang to the east, Manpo to the north and west, and Wiwon to the south. Formerly part of Kanggye, Sijung became a separate county in 1952 as part of a general reorganization of local government.

Songwon County County in Chagang Province, North Korea

Songwŏn County is a kun, or county, in southwestern Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Usi and Kop'ung counties to the north, Tongsin to the east, and Hŭich'ŏn to the south, as well as North P'yŏngan's Tongchang county to the west. Originally part of Chosan, it was established as a separate county in 1949, when Chagang province was created.

Wiwon County County in Chagang Province, North Korea

Wiwŏn County is a kun, or county, in northern Chagang province, North Korea. It stands across the Yalu River from the People's Republic of China. It was originally part of North P'yŏngan province, but was annexed to Chagang in 1954. It borders Manp'o and Sijungto the north, Kanggye and Songgan to the east, Ch'onch'ŏn to the southeast, Kop'ung to the south and west, and Ch'osan to the west.

Changsong County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Changsŏng County is a kun, or county, in northern North Phyŏngan province, North Korea. It is bordered by Pyŏktong to the east, Tongchang and Taegwan to the south, Sakchu to the west; to the north, it faces China across the Yalu (Amrok) River.

Chonma County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Ch'ŏnma County is a kun, or county, in northwestern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It borders Kusŏng city and Taegwan county to the east, Sonch'ŏn and Tongrim counties to the south, Ŭiju and P'ihyŏn counties to the west, and Sakchu county to the north. It was created in 1952 from parts of Kusŏng and Ŭiju.

Cholsan County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Ch'ŏlsan County is a kun, or county, in North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It occupies the Ch'ŏlsan Peninsula, which juts into the Yellow Sea. Ch'ŏlsan borders Yŏmju and Tongrim counties to the north, and is bounded on all other sides by water.

Pyoktong County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Pyŏktong County is a kun, or county, in northern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It lies in the valley of the Yalu River, and borders China to the north. Within North Korea, it is bounded by Tongch'ang in the south, Ch'angsŏng in the west, and Usi county in Chagang province to the east. It was separated from Usi in 1952, as part of a nationwide reorganization of local government.

Sakchu County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Sakchu County is a kun, or county, in northern part of North P'yŏngan province, in North Korea. It lies along the Yalu River bordering the People's Republic of China to the north. Within North Korea, it borders Ch'angsŏng to the east, Ch'ŏnma and Taegwan to the south, and Ŭiju to the west.

Taechon County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

T'aechŏn County is a kun, or county, in central North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It borders Taegwan and Tongch'ang to the north, Unsan and Nyŏngbyŏn to the east, Pakch'ŏn and Unjŏn to the south, and Kusŏng to the west.

Sindo County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Sindo County is a kun (county) in the North P'yŏngan province of North Korea. Most of the county consists of Pidansŏm, an island in the estuary of the Yalu River. Sindo was established as a separate county in 1991; previously, it had been part of Ryongch'ŏn, although it had enjoyed a brief existence as a separate county in 1967.

Usi County County in Chagang Province, North Korea

Usi County is a kun, or county, in westernmost Chagang Province, North Korea. It looks across the Yalu River into the People's Republic of China. Within North Korea, it borders Chosan and Kopung to the east, Songwon to the south, and North Pyongan Province's Pyoktong county to the west. Originally part of Pyoktong, it was made a separate county in 1952 as part of a general reorganization of local government; in 1954, it was transferred from North Pyongan to Chagang.

References

  1. Past news
  2. "Chosan Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 1 December 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  3. Past news

Coordinates: 40°36′11″N125°18′22″E / 40.6030°N 125.3060°E / 40.6030; 125.3060