Songgan County

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Songgan County

성간군
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja城干郡
  McCune-ReischauerSŏnggan kun
  Revised RomanizationSeonggan-gun
DPRK2006 Chagang-Songgan.PNG
Map of Chagang showing the location of Songgan
Country North Korea
Province Chagang Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 5 workers' districts, 9 ri
Area
  Total950 km2 (370 sq mi)
Population
 (1991 est.)
  Total100,000

Songgan County is a kun, or county, in central Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Rangrim to the east, Wiwon to the west, Kanggye to the north and Chonchon and Ryongrim to the south. It was formed in 1952 from parts of Chonchon and Changgang, as part of a general reorganization of local government.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Kanggye Municipal City in Chagang Province, North Korea

Kanggye is the provincial capital of Chagang, North Korea and has a population of 251,971. Because of its strategic importance, derived from its topography, it has been of military interest from the time of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).

Contents

Songgan nestles among the Rangrim mountains in north central North Korea, its terrain sloping downward toward the Changja River in the west. The highest point is Maengbusan in the Rangrim range, which stands 2,214 m above sea level. 92% of the county's area is taken up by forestland.

The Changja River is a river of North Korea. The Changja River flows through the north of the county and flows through the city of Kanggye.

The Manpo Line railroad follows the river through western Songgan. The county is also connected to Kanggye and Pyongyang by road. The chief local industries are logging and agriculture. Grains including maize, wheat, and millet are raised in Songgan, as are cattle and silkworms.

Manpo Line railway line

The Manp'o Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the North Korean State Railway running from Sunch'ŏn on the P'yŏngra Line to Manp'o on the Pukpu Line. The line continues on from Manp'o to Ji'an, China.

Pyongyang Directly governed city in Pyongan Province, North Korea

Pyongyang, P'yŏngyang or Pyeongyang, is the capital and largest city of North Korea. Pyongyang is located on the Taedong River about 109 kilometres (68 mi) upstream from its mouth on the Yellow Sea. According to the 2008 population census, it has a population of 3,255,288. It is a directly-administered city with equal status to North Korean provinces.

Administrative divisions

Songgan-gun is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 5 rodongjagu  [ ko ] (workers' districts) and 9 ri (villages):

A ri or village is an administrative unit in both North Korea and South Korea similar to the unit of village.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in East Asia on the Northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. It is also spoken in parts of Sakhalin, Russia, and Central Asia.


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