Dord (instrument)

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Bronze Age horns in the Irish Museum. The largest in this image is 7 /2 feet (2.3 m) long, with the second largest at 6 feet (1.8 m). Bronzeageirishhorns.png
Bronze Age horns in the Irish Museum. The largest in this image is 7 2 feet (2.3 m) long, with the second largest at 6 feet (1.8 m).

The dord is a bronze horn native to Ireland, with excavated examples dating back as far as 1000 BC, during the Bronze Age. 104 original dords are known to exist, although replicas have been built since the late 20th century. [1]

Bronze Age Prehistoric period and age studied in archaeology, part of the Holocene Epoch

The Bronze Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, and in some areas proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze-Iron system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies.

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Though the musical tradition of the dord has been lost, modern performers such as Rolf Harris and Alan Dargin believe it was played in a manner similar to the didgeridoo and apply that technique (including circular breathing and shifts in timbre) accordingly for modern fusion music. The Irish musician Simon O'Dwyer attempts to recreate historically accurate dord. [2]

Rolf Harris Australian-born, British-based entertainer and convicted sex offender

Rolf Harris is an Australian entertainer whose career has encompassed work as a musician, singer-songwriter, composer, comedian, actor, painter and television personality.

Alan Dargin Australian musician

Alan Dargin was an indigenous Australian musician and songwriter known for being a didgeridoo player. He grew up in Wee Waa and started learning the instrument at age five from his grandfather and other Wiradjuri elders. His signature instrument was over a hundred years old and was made from a blood wood eucalypt. He received his secondary education at St Pius X High School, Newcastle.

Didgeridoo wind instrument

The didgeridoo is a wind instrument developed by Indigenous Australians of northern Australia potentially within the last 1,500 years and still in widespread use today both in Australia and around the world. It is sometimes described as a natural wooden trumpet or "drone pipe". Musicologists classify it as a brass aerophone.

See also

Carnyx Celtic musical instrument

The carnyx was a wind instrument of the Iron Age Celts, used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200. It was a type of bronze trumpet with an elongated S shape, held so that the long straight central portion was vertical and the short mouthpiece end section and the much wider bell were horizontal in opposed directions. The bell was styled in the shape of an open-mouthed boar's, or other animal's, head.

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Celtic art art

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Bronze Age Europe

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Cross of Cong 12th-century Irish Christian cross

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Gold working in the Bronze Age British Isles

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Dord is a word accidentally created via an error in lexicography.

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