Earl of Merioneth

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Earl of Merioneth
Coat of Arms of Charles, Prince of Wales.svg
Creation date20 November 1947
CreationFirst
Monarch King George VI
Peerage Peerage of the United Kingdom
First holder Prince Philip
Present holder Prince Charles [1]
Heir apparent Prince William
Remainder tothe 1st Earl's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten
StatusExtant
Seat(s) Clarence House
Prince Charles, the current Earl of Merioneth Carlos de Gales (2011).jpg
Prince Charles, the current Earl of Merioneth

The title Earl of Merioneth is a Peerage of the United Kingdom created in 1947 along with the Duke of Edinburgh and the Baron Greenwich for Prince Philip. [2]

Merionethshire is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, a vice county and a former administrative county.

Earl of Merioneth (1947)

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References

  1. "HRH The Duke of Edinburgh". College of Arms. 9 April 2021. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  2. "No. 38128". The London Gazette . 21 November 1947. pp. 5495–5496.