Edeirnion

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A map of Wales with Merionethshire highlighted. Edeirnion Rural District is the protrusion in the north east of Meirionnydd. WalesMerionethTrad.png
A map of Wales with Merionethshire highlighted. Edeirnion Rural District is the protrusion in the north east of Meirionnydd.

Edeirnion or Edeyrnion is an area of the county of Denbighshire and an ancient commote of medieval Wales in the cantref of Penllyn. According to tradition, it was named after its eponymous founder Edern or Edeyrn. It was included as a Welsh territory of Shropshire in the Domesday Book.

Denbighshire County and Principal area in Wales

Denbighshire is a county in north-east Wales, named after the historic county of Denbighshire, but with substantially different borders. Denbighshire is the longest known inhabited part of Wales. Pontnewydd (Bontnewydd-Llanelwy) Palaeolithic site has Neanderthal remains from 225,000 years ago. Its several castles include Denbigh, Rhuddlan, Ruthin, Castell Dinas Bran and Bodelwyddan. St Asaph, one of the smallest cities in Britain, has one of the smallest Anglican cathedrals. Denbighshire has a length of coast to the north and hill ranges to the east, south and west. In the central part, the River Clwyd has created a broad fertile valley. It is primarily a rural county with little industry. Crops are grown in the Vale of Clwyd and cattle and sheep reared in the uplands. The coast attracts summer tourists, and hikers frequent the Clwydian Range, which forms an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty with the upper Dee Valley. Llangollen hosts the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod in each July.

Commote a secular division of land in Medieval Wales

A commote, was a secular division of land in Medieval Wales. The word derives from the prefix cym- and the noun bod. The English word "commote" is derived from the Middle Welsh cymwt.

Cantref medieval Welsh land division

A cantref was a medieval Welsh land division, particularly important in the administration of Welsh law.

Contents

Edeirnion was nominally a part of the Kingdom of Powys but was often subject to border intrusions by the neighbouring Kingdom of Gwynedd. It was the patrimony of Owain Brogyntyn. These rumbling border disputes caused a great deal of friction between the two realms. Edeirnion was occupied and annexed by Gwynedd in the reign of Llywelyn the Great but briefly returned to Powys following a treaty forced on Gwynedd by England after Llywelyn's death in 1240. The territory was again occupied by Gwynedd after 1267 before being returned again to Powys. This continuing dispute and the appeal by Llywelyn ap Gruffudd to Edward I of England to see the resolution of this dispute settled by Welsh Law was one of the reasons the principalities in the north of Wales were unable to unite in opposition to English hegemony and was a contributing factor to the final war between the Principality of Wales and England, which ultimately saw the end of Welsh independence.

Kingdom of Powys kingdom in mid Wales

The Kingdom of Powys was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages following the end of Roman rule in Britain. It very roughly covered the top two thirds of the modern county of Powys and part of today's English West Midlands. More precisely, and based on the Romano-British tribal lands of the Ordovices in the west and the Cornovii in the east, its boundaries originally extended from the Cambrian Mountains in the west to include the modern West Midlands region of England in the east. The fertile river valleys of the Severn and Tern are found here, and this region is referred to in later Welsh literature as "the Paradise of Powys".

Kingdom of Gwynedd Kingdom in north Wales

The Kingdom of Gwynedd was a Roman Empire successor state that emerged in sub-Roman Britain in the 5th century during the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain.

Owain Brogyntyn prince

Owain Brogyntyn ap Madog was the third and illegitimate son of king Madog ap Maredudd, the last king of a united Kingdom of Powys. He was the son of Madog by the daughter of the Maer du or "black mayor" of Rûg in Edeyrnion however some sources cite his mother as Susanna making him legitimate instead. He was the brother of Gruffydd Maelor the ancestor of Owain Glyndŵr. Presumably Owain Brogyntyn would have been raised by his mother at Rûg in Edeyrnion. He was acknowledged by his father and granted by him the lordship of Edeyrnion and also Dinmael. It is quite possible that he inherited some of these lands through his maternal grandfather, the Maer Du, which were confirmed and perhaps extended by his father the king of Powys. At some point he also came into possession of Castle Brogyntyn on the English borders at Selattyn close to Oswestry.

Edeirnion still exists as a bro, or region, in Denbighshire, located around Corwen and near the Berwyn Range.

Corwen town, community and electoral ward in Denbighshire, Wales

Corwen is a town, community and electoral ward in the county of Denbighshire in Wales; it was previously part of the county of Merioneth. Corwen stands on the banks of the River Dee beneath the Berwyn mountains. The town is situated 10 miles (16 km) west of Llangollen and 13 miles (21 km) south of Ruthin. At the 2001 Census, Corwen had a population of 2,398, reducing to 2,325 at the 2011 census. The community includes the villages of Carrog and Glyndyfrdwy. The built-up area according to Nomis was 477 but does not include the estate of Clawdd Poncen. Including Clawdd Poncen the total is 777.

Berwyn range mountain in the United Kingdom

The Berwyn range is an isolated and sparsely populated area of moorland in the northeast of Wales, roughly bounded by Llangollen in the northeast, Corwen in the northwest, Bala in the southwest, and Oswestry in the southeast.

Edeirnion Rural District

Edeirnion Rural District was created under the Local Government Act 1894 from that part of Corwen Rural Sanitary District which was in the former administrative county of Merionethshire. It consisted of six civil parishes and covered 47,460 acres (192.1 km2); it continued in existence until 1974, when it was abolished, as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, becoming part of the Glyndŵr District of Clwyd. In 1901 it had a population of 5,132, which had fallen to 3,925 by 1961. [1] It was the only part of Merionethshire not included in the Meirionnydd District of Gwynedd. In 1996 Edeirnion became part of Denbighshire.

Local Government Act 1894 United Kingdom legislation

The Local Government Act 1894 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales outside the County of London. The Act followed the reforms carried out at county level under the Local Government Act 1888. The 1894 legislation introduced elected councils at district and parish level.

Merionethshire historic county of Wales

Merionethshire or Merioneth is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, a vice county and a former administrative county.

Civil parish Territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

List of former civil parishes

ImageNamePeriodPopulation 1961County Community Refs
Bettws Gwerfil Goch - geograph.org.uk - 125508.jpg Betws Gwerfil Goch 1894
1974
155 Denbighshire Betws Gwerfil Goch [2]
Wesleyan Chapel. Corwen - geograph.org.uk - 712640.jpg Corwen 1894
1974
2,048 Denbighshire Corwen [3]
Ty Mawr, Gwyddelwern - geograph.org.uk - 791560.jpg Gwyddelwern 1894
1974
556 Denbighshire Gwyddelwern [4]
Cynwyd - geograph.org.uk - 421251.jpg Llangar 1894
1974
506 Denbighshire Cynwyd [5]
Bridge in Llandrillo - geograph.org.uk - 290772.jpg Llandrillo-yn-Edeirnion 1894
1974
542 Denbighshire Llandrillo [6]
Afon Morwynion near Carrog - geograph.org.uk - 355959.jpg Llansanffraid Glyndyfrdwy 1894
1974
118 Denbighshire Corwen [7]

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Gwynedd A county in Wales, adjacent to Powys, Conwy, Anglesey, and Ceredigion

Gwynedd is a county in Wales, sharing borders with Powys, Conwy, Denbighshire, Anglesey over the Menai Strait, and Ceredigion over the River Dyfi. The scenic Llŷn Peninsula and most of Snowdonia National Park are in Gwynedd. Bangor is the home of Bangor University. In the northern part of the county, the other main settlements are Caernarfon, Bethesda, Ffestiniog, Llanddeiniolen, Llanllyfni, Porthmadog and Pwllheli. The largest settlement in the south is Tywyn.

Denbighshire (historic) former county in Wales

Historic Denbighshire is one of thirteen traditional counties in Wales, a vice-county and a former administrative county, which covers an area in north east Wales. It is a maritime county, bounded to the north by the Irish Sea, to the east by Flintshire, Cheshire and Shropshire, to the south by Montgomeryshire and Merionethshire, and to the west by Caernarfonshire.

Powys Fadog

Powys Fadog was the northern portion of the former princely realm of Powys, which split in two following the death of Madog ap Maredudd in 1160. The realm was divided under Welsh law, with Madog's nephew Owain Cyfeiliog inheriting the south and his son Gruffydd Maelor I, who inherited the north.

Llŷn Peninsula peninsula

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Llandrillo, Denbighshire community

Llandrillo is a small village and community in the Edeirnion area of Denbighshire in Wales, between Bala, and Corwen on the B4401 road. It was historically in the county of Merionethshire, and has a population of 580.

Rhug

Rhug is a township in the parish of Corwen, Denbighshire, Wales, formerly in the old cantref of Edeirnion and later a part of Merionethshire, two miles from Corwen and ten miles north east of Bala. It includes the hamlet of Bonwen. It is situated near the River Dee, under Berwyn range. About 1150, it was ruled by the Maer Du or "Black Mayor of Rhug" and later became part of the lands of the barons of Edeirnion who ruled from Gwerclas Castle.

Llangian village in Wales

Llangian is a small village and former civil parish on the Llŷn Peninsula in the Welsh county of Gwynedd. It is located 1 mile (1.6 km) north west of Abersoch, in the community of Llanengan. The parish was abolished in 1934 and divided between Llanengan and Botwnnog.

Llansanffraid Glyndyfrdwy village in Wales

Llansanffraid Glyndyfrdwy is a former civil parish in the Edeirnion area of Denbighshire in Wales. Until 1974 it was part of Meirionnydd, and was transferred to Glyndŵr District in Clwyd by the Local Government Act 1972. It became part of Denbighshire in 1996, and now forms part of the community of Corwen. It includes the village of Carrog.

Betws Gwerfil Goch village in the United Kingdom

Betws Gwerfil Goch is a village and community in Denbighshire, Wales. It had a population of 351 at the 2011 census. Until 1974 it was part of Edeirnion Rural District in Meirionnydd, and was transferred to Glyndŵr District in Clwyd by the Local Government Act 1972. It became part of Denbighshire in 1996. The community includes Melin-y-Wig village.

Ceidio village in Gwynedd, Wales

Ceidio is a former civil parish in the Welsh county of Gwynedd. It was abolished in 1934, and incorporated into Buan.

Llandegwning village in the United Kingdom

Llandegwning is a village and former civil parish in the Welsh county of Gwynedd. The parish was abolished in 1934, and incorporated into Botwnnog.

Llandudwen human settlement in United Kingdom

Llandudwen is a former civil parish in the Welsh county of Gwynedd. It was abolished in 1934, and divided between Buan and Tudweiliog.

Llanfihangel Bachellaeth human settlement in United Kingdom

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Llangwnnadl village in United Kingdom

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Llaniestyn, Gwynedd village in Gwynedd, Wales

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Penllech village in United Kingdom

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Penllyn, Gwynedd area around Llyn Tegid and Bala, Gwynedd

Penllyn is a former civil parish in the Welsh county of Gwynedd. The parish was created in 1894 from the part of Criccieth parish that lay outside the ancient borough. It was abolished in 1934, and divided between Llanystumdwy and Criccieth. The area gives its name to a special stage used during the 2013 Wales Rally GB.

Penrhos, Gwynedd village in Gwynedd, United Kingdom

Penrhos is a village and former civil parish in the Welsh county of Gwynedd. The parish was abolished in 1934, and incorporated into Llannor. It was the home of former MP Goronwy Roberts. Penyberth lies within its confines.

References

Coordinates: 52°56′49″N3°25′01″W / 52.947°N 3.417°W / 52.947; -3.417

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.