Electoral results for the district of Floreat

Last updated

This is a list of electoral results for the Electoral district of Floreat in Western Australian elections.

Contents

Members for Floreat

MemberPartyTerm
  Andrew Mensaros Liberal 1968–1991
  Liz Constable Independent 1991–1996

Election results

Elections in the 1990s

1993 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Liz Constable 11,29857.9+57.9
Liberal Douglas Jecks7,12736.5-26.8
Greens Geoffrey Dodson7864.0+4.0
Democrats Noreen O'Connor3001.5-4.4
Total formal votes19,51198.0+2.0
Informal votes3992.0-2.0
Turnout 19,91095.1+3.5
Two-candidate-preferred result
Independent Liz Constable 12,25162.8+62.8
Liberal Douglas Jecks7,26037.2-33.1
Independent hold Swing +62.8
1991 Floreat state by-election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Liz Constable 8,35849.0+49.0
Liberal Michael Huston6,30237.0-26.3
Greens John White9325.5+5.5
Independent Barbara Churchward6633.9+3.9
Independent Geoffrey McPhee3231.9+1.9
Independent Paul Cribbon2921.7+1.7
Independent Alfred Bussell950.6+0.6
Grey Power Jane King860.5-7.6
Total formal votes17,05097.5+1.5
Informal votes4362.5-1.5
Turnout 17,48682.9-8.7
Two-candidate-preferred result
Independent Liz Constable 10,04958.9+58.9
Liberal Michael Huston7,00141.1-29.2
Independent gain from Liberal Swing N/A

Elections in the 1980s

1989 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 11,84063.3-1.6
Labor Clyde Bevan4,24222.7-12.0
Grey Power Jane King1,5208.1+8.1
Democrats Georgina Beaumont1,1105.9+5.9
Total formal votes18,71296.0
Informal votes7834.0
Turnout 19,49591.6
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 13,15070.3+5.2
Labor Clyde Bevan5,56229.7-5.2
Liberal hold Swing +5.2
1986 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 11,47364.6+10.0
Labor Ian Bacon6,28935.4-0.1
Total formal votes17,76297.8-0.4
Informal votes3992.2+0.4
Turnout 18,16191.9+2.8
Liberal hold Swing +5.0
1983 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 8,89454.6
Labor Peter Keating5,77235.5
Independent Robert Ward1,6089.9
Total formal votes16,27498.2
Informal votes2981.8
Turnout 16,57289.1
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 9,69959.6
Labor Peter Keating6,57540.4
Liberal hold Swing
1980 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 9,18864.4-6.8
Labor Dorothy Anderson3,65825.6+1.6
Democrats Desmond Wooding1,42210.0+10.0
Total formal votes14,26898.1-0.3
Informal votes2761.9+0.3
Turnout 14,54491.0-1.7
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 9,89969.4-4.2
Labor Dorothy Anderson4,36930.6+4.2
Liberal hold Swing -4.2

Elections in the 1970s

1977 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 10,10171.2
Labor Hilary Snell3,40424.0
Independent Frank Parry6754.8
Total formal votes14,18098.4
Informal votes2281.6
Turnout 14,40892.7
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 10,43973.6+9.8
Labor Hilary Snell3,74126.4-9.8
Liberal hold Swing +9.8
1974 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 8,40756.6
Labor Peter Coyle5,01233.8
National Alliance Peter McGowan1,4219.6
Total formal votes14,84097.6
Informal votes3662.4
Turnout 15,20691.4
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 9,61564.8
Labor Peter Coyle5,22535.2
Liberal hold Swing
1971 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 5,78647.7+2.0
Labor Leslie Park3,32627.4-4.8
Independent Joan Watters2,05617.0+17.0
Democratic Labor Bernard Flanagan9547.9+0.1
Total formal votes12,12297.8-0.4
Informal votes2732.2+0.4
Turnout 12,39590.6-1.5
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Andrew Mensaros 7,57462.5-2.1
Labor Leslie Park4,54837.5+2.1
Liberal hold Swing -2.1

Elections in the 1960s

1968 Western Australian state election: Floreat
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal and Country Andrew Mensaros 4,93845.7
Labor Lyla Elliott 3,47432.2
Country George Gummow1,54614.3
Democratic Labor Bernard Flanagan8397.8
Total formal votes10,79798.2
Informal votes1991.8
Turnout 10,99692.1
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal and Country Andrew Mensaros 6,97764.6
Labor Lyla Elliott 3,82035.4
Liberal and Country hold Swing

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