Electoral results for the district of Avon

Last updated

This is a list of electoral results for the electoral district of Avon in Western Australian state elections.

Contents

Members for Avon

Avon (1911–1950)
MemberPartyTerm
  Thomas Bath Labor 1911–1914
  Tom Harrison Country 1914–1923
 Country (MCP)1923–1924
  Harry Griffiths Country (ECP)1924
 Country1924–1935
  Ignatius Boyle Country1935–1943
  William Telfer Labor1943–1947
  George Cornell Country1947–1950
Avon Valley (1950–1962)
MemberPartyTerm
  James Mann Liberal Country League 1950–1962
Avon (1962–2008)
MemberPartyTerm
  Harry Gayfer Country1962–1974
  Ken McIver Labor1974–1986
  Max Trenorden National 1986–2008

Election results

Elections in the 2000s

2005 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Max Trenorden 7,46963.8+36.9
Labor Gerry Sturman2,65022.6+0.8
Greens Adrian Price6865.9+1.4
One Nation Boyd Martin4704.0-15.1
Christian Democrats Bob Adair2782.4+2.4
CEC Ron McLean1491.3+1.3
Total formal votes11,70295.3-0.2
Informal votes5714.7+0.2
Turnout 12,27390.9
Two-party-preferred result
National Max Trenorden 8,42972.1+14.2
Labor Gerry Sturman3,26627.9-14.2
National hold Swing +14.2
2001 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Max Trenorden 2,96524.9-36.0
Labor Phil Shearer2,84723.9-3.7
One Nation Ken Collins2,20218.5+18.5
Liberal Joanne Burges1,90516.0+16.0
Independent Peter Morton1,0268.6+8.6
Greens Kate Elsey6575.5+5.5
Curtin Labor Alliance Stuart Smith2882.4+2.4
Total formal votes11,89095.8+0.4
Informal votes5224.2-0.4
Turnout 12,41292.6
Two-party-preferred result
National Max Trenorden 6,39554.8-12.0
Labor Phil Shearer5,26945.2+12.0
National hold Swing -12.0

Elections in the 1990s

1996 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Max Trenorden 6,79560.9+22.9
Labor Paul Andrews 3,08027.6-2.4
Independent Stephen Bluck1,27611.4+11.4
Total formal votes11,15195.4-0.9
Informal votes5364.6+0.9
Turnout 11,68791.0
Two-party-preferred result
National Max Trenorden 7,43566.8+1.9
Labor Paul Andrews 3,70333.2-1.9
National hold Swing +1.9
1993 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Max Trenorden 4,55538.8-0.7
Labor Walerjan Sieczka3,40329.0-2.7
Liberal Bevan Henderson2,75123.4-5.4
Independent Paul Maycock1,0308.8+8.8
Total formal votes11,73996.4+3.3
Informal votes4393.6-3.3
Turnout 12,17894.2+2.5
Two-party-preferred result
National Max Trenorden 7,75066.00.0
Labor Walerjan Sieczka3,98934.00.0
National hold Swing 0.0

Elections in the 1980s

1989 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Max Trenorden 4,13239.5+10.9
Labor Robert Duncanson3,31531.7-11.8
Liberal John Dival3,00728.8+1.0
Total formal votes10,45493.1
Informal votes7696.9
Turnout 11,22391.7
Two-party-preferred result
National Max Trenorden 6,90066.0+11.4
Labor Robert Duncanson3,55434.0-11.4
National hold Swing +11.4
1986 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Ken McIver 4,18646.5-6.1
National Max Trenorden 2,57528.6+5.3
Liberal Michael Cahill2,25025.0+0.9
Total formal votes9,01198.5+0.5
Informal votes1391.5-0.5
Turnout 9,15093.9+3.8
Two-party-preferred result
National Max Trenorden 4,66851.8+51.8
Labor Ken McIver 4,34348.2-10.2
National gain from Labor Swing N/A
1983 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Ken McIver 4,37752.6
Liberal Thomas Richards2,00424.1
National Country Max Trenorden 1,93823.3
Total formal votes8,31998.0
Informal votes1682.0
Turnout 8,48790.1
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Ken McIver 4,85858.4
Liberal Thomas Richards3,46141.6
Labor hold Swing
1980 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Ken McIver 3,91355.4+1.6
Liberal Julian Stanwix2,12430.1-16.1
National Country Allan Baxter1,02114.5+14.5
Total formal votes7,05897.0-0.7
Informal votes2193.0+0.7
Turnout 7,27792.0-1.8
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Ken McIver 4,00556.7+2.9
Liberal Julian Stanwix3,05343.3-2.9
Labor hold Swing +2.9

Elections in the 1970s

1977 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Ken McIver 3,78753.8
Liberal Kelvin Bulloch3,25746.2
Total formal votes7,04497.7
Informal votes1682.3
Turnout 7,21293.8
Labor hold Swing -0.9
1974 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Ken McIver 3,54250.5
Liberal Owen Bloomfield1,77725.3
National Alliance Albert Llewellyn1,69224.1
Total formal votes7,01198.0
Informal votes1402.0
Turnout 7,15192.2
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Ken McIver 3,79654.1
Liberal Owen Bloomfield3,21545.9
Labor hold Swing
1971 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Harry Gayfer 4,14575.3-24.7
Independent Tom Ingham78614.3+14.3
Democratic Labor Brian Marwick57610.5+10.5
Total formal votes5,50796.9
Informal votes1733.1
Turnout 5,68093.0
Two-candidate-preferred result
Country Harry Gayfer 4,43380.5-19.5
Independent Tom Ingham1,07419.5+19.5
Country hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1960s

1968 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Harry Gayfer unopposed
Country hold Swing
1965 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Harry Gayfer unopposed
Country hold Swing
1962 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal and Country Arthur Kelly1,72437.4
Country Harry Gayfer 1,65536.0
Country Leonard Doncon1,22426.6
Total formal votes4,60398.6
Informal votes671.4
Turnout 4,67095.8
Two-candidate-preferred result
Country Harry Gayfer 2,63357.2
Liberal and Country Arthur Kelly1,97042.8
Country gain from Liberal and Country Swing

Elections in the 1950s

1959 Western Australian state election: Avon Valley
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal and Country James Mann 2,71260.6-1.5
Country John Stratton1,76139.4+1.5
Total formal votes4,47397.7+1.1
Informal votes1062.3-1.1
Turnout 4,57993.3+1.7
Liberal and Country hold Swing -1.5
1956 Western Australian state election: Avon Valley
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal and Country James Mann 2,74662.1
Country John Stratton1,67937.9
Total formal votes4,42596.6
Informal votes1553.4
Turnout 4,58091.6
Liberal and Country hold Swing
1953 Western Australian state election: Avon Valley
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal and Country James Mann unopposed
Liberal and Country hold Swing
1950 Western Australian state election: Avon Valley
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal and Country James Mann 2,13556.5
Country Keith Halbert99426.3
Country Milford Smith64817.2
Total formal votes3,77797.9
Informal votes792.1
Turnout 3,85693.8
Liberal and Country hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s

1947 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country George Cornell 1,52950.7+1.0
Labor William Telfer 1,48749.3-1.0
Total formal votes3,01698.8+1.0
Informal votes381.2-1.0
Turnout 3,05485.7-1.9
Country gain from Labor Swing +1.0
1943 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor William Telfer 1,43350.3+8.0
Country Ignatius Boyle 1,41849.7-8.0
Total formal votes2,85197.8+0.3
Informal votes642.2-0.3
Turnout 2,91587.6-5.9
Labor gain from Country Swing +8.0

Elections in the 1930s

1939 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Ignatius Boyle 1,97257.7+4.8
Independent Country John Tankard1,44542.3+42.3
Total formal votes3,41797.5-0.5
Informal votes892.5+0.5
Turnout 3,50693.5+25.9
Country hold Swing N/A
1936 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Ignatius Boyle 1,30152.9+11.3
Country Hugh Harling1,16047.1+47.1
Total formal votes2,46198.0+0.3
Informal votes512.0-0.3
Turnout 2,51267.6-24.2
Country hold Swing N/A
1933 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Fred Law1,60846.0+9.2
Country Harry Griffiths 1,45341.6-21.6
Country John Mann43312.4+12.4
Total formal votes3,49497.7-1.5
Informal votes832.3+1.5
Turnout 3,57791.8+17.3
Two-party-preferred result
Country Harry Griffiths 1,78151.0-12.2
Labor Fred Law1,71349.0+12.2
Country hold Swing -12.2
1930 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Harry Griffiths 1,98163.2
Labor James Bermingham1,15336.8
Total formal votes3,13499.2
Informal votes250.8
Turnout 3,15974.5
Country hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s

1927 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Harry Griffiths 2,14359.7+35.1
Labor Patrick Coffey1,44940.3-4.6
Total formal votes3,56599.2+0.9
Informal votes270.8-0.9
Turnout 3,61969.1+8.1
Country hold Swing +9.2
1924 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Patrick Coffey1,19944.9-0.6
Executive Country Harry Griffiths 65724.6+24.6
Country Tom Harrison 50418.9-30.6
Executive Country Tom Bolton31111.6+11.6
Total formal votes2,67198.3+0.2
Informal votes461.7-0.2
Turnout 2,71761.0+4.3
Two-party-preferred result
Executive Country Harry Griffiths 1,35050.5+50.5
Labor Patrick Coffey1,32149.5+2.2
Executive Country gain from Country Swing N/A
1921 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Tom Harrison 1,02849.5+14.2
Labor Steven Donovan94345.5+7.8
Independent Country Alma McCorry1045.0+5.0
Total formal votes2,07598.1+1.1
Informal votes401.9-1.1
Turnout 2,11556.7-1.4
Two-party-preferred result
Country Tom Harrison 1,09352.7-2.3
Labor Steven Donovan98247.3+2.3
Country hold Swing -2.3

Elections in the 1910s

1917 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Patrick Coffey84337.7–8.0
National Country Thomas Harrison 78935.3–19.0
Nationalist Thomas Duff 31414.1+14.1
Country William Carroll 28812.9+12.9
Total formal votes2,23497.0–2.7
Informal votes683.0+2.7
Turnout 2,30258.1+0.3
Two-party-preferred result
National Country Thomas Harrison 1,22855.0+0.7
Labor Patrick Coffey1,00645.0–0.7
National Country hold Swing +0.7
1914 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Country Tom Harrison 1,31854.3+54.3
Labor Thomas Bath 1,11045.7-7.1
Total formal votes2,42899.7+0.1
Informal votes80.3-0.1
Turnout 2,43657.7+12.1
Country gain from Labor Swing N/A
1911 Western Australian state election: Avon
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Thomas Bath 1,15552.8
Ministerial Hal Colebatch 1,03247.2
Total formal votes2,18799.6
Informal votes80.4
Turnout 2,19569.8
Labor win(new seat)

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References