King Parker House

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King Parker House
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Location304 Mount Moriah Rd., near Winton, North Carolina
Coordinates 36°23′15″N76°59′32″W / 36.38750°N 76.99222°W / 36.38750; -76.99222 Coordinates: 36°23′15″N76°59′32″W / 36.38750°N 76.99222°W / 36.38750; -76.99222
Area27 acres (11 ha)
Builtc. 1850 (1850)
Architectural styleGreek Revival
NRHP reference # 02001663 [1]
Added to NRHPDecember 31, 2002

King Parker House is a historic home located near Winton, Hertford County, North Carolina. It was built about 1850, and is a two-story, three-bay, single-pile vernacular Greek Revival style frame dwelling. It has a low-pitched, side-gable roof and front portico with vernacular Italianate fretwork. The house encompasses an 18th-century, one-room, 1 1/2-story, gable-roofed building. [2]

Winton, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Winton is a town and the county seat of Hertford County, North Carolina, United States. It is governed by the Town Council which consists of a Mayor and five Council members. The population was 769 at the 2010 census.

Hertford County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Hertford County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,669. Its county seat is Winton. It is classified within the region known in the 21st century as the Inner Banks.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. It revived the style of ancient Greek architecture, in particular the Greek temple, with varying degrees of thoroughness and consistency. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture, which had for long mainly drawn from Roman architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. Heather Fearnbach (February 2002). "King Parker House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-01-01.