List of presidents of Georgetown University

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The Office of the President is housed in Healy Hall. Georgetown University entrance.JPG
The Office of the President is housed in Healy Hall.

Georgetown University is a private Jesuit research university in Washington, D.C. that was founded as Georgetown College by Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore in 1789. [2] The president of Georgetown University is its chief executive officer, [3] and from its establishment until the 1960s was also the rector of the university's Jesuit community. [4] The president is elected by and may be removed by the university's board of directors, and is ex officio a member of the board. The president is also one of five members of the university's legal corporation, [3] known as the President and Directors of Georgetown College, which was first chartered by the United States Congress in 1815. [5]

Contents

The president is charged with control over the "business affairs and properties" of the university, and appoints the vice presidents and administrators and, with the concurrence of the board, appoints the provost, secretary, and treasurer of the university. The president may remove any officer, vice president, or administrator by his accord, except the provost, secretary, and treasurer, which require the concurrence of the board. In the event that the office is vacant, the powers of the presidency are exercised by the provost. [3] The president is among the 100 highest-paid university presidents in the United States. [6]

Of the 41 individuals to have held the office, nearly all have been Jesuits. [4] Only one has been a member of another religious order while president: Louis William Valentine DuBourg, who was a Sulpician. [7] Three presidents have gone on to become bishops: DuBourg, [7] Leonard Neale, [8] and Benedict Joseph Fenwick. [9] Every president has been a Catholic priest except one, the current president, John J. DeGioia. [4] Having assumed office on July 1, 2001, [10] DeGioia is the university's longest-serving president. [4]

Key
SJ Society of Jesus
SS Society of the Priests of Saint Sulpice

Presidents

Giovanni Antonio Grassi Giovanni Antonio Grassi portrait.jpg
Giovanni Antonio Grassi
Patrick Francis Healy Patrick Francis Healy.jpg
Patrick Francis Healy
J. Havens Richards J. Havens Richards portrait.png
J. Havens Richards
W. Coleman Nevils W. Coleman Nevils.png
W. Coleman Nevils
Timothy S. Healy Timothy S. Healy.png
Timothy S. Healy
John J. DeGioia John J. DeGioia at the World Economic Forum Summit on the Global Agenda 2008.jpg
John J. DeGioia
Presidents
No.NameYearsNotesRef.
1 Robert Plunkett SJ1791–1793 [11]
2 Robert Molyneux SJ1793–1796Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Mission (1805–1808) [12] [11]
3 Louis William Valentine DuBourg SS1796–1798Founder and President of St. Mary's College (1799–1810); Bishop of Louisiana and the Two Floridas (1815–1826); Bishop of Montauban (1826–1833); Archbishop of Besançon (1833). [7] [11]
4 Leonard Neale SJ1798–1806 Coadjutor Bishop of Baltimore (1795–1815); Archbishop of Baltimore (1815–1817) [8] [11]
5 Robert Molyneux SJ1806–1808 [11]
6 Francis Neale SJ1808–1809Acting president [11]
7 William Matthews 1809President of the Washington Seminary (1824–1848). [13] Georgetown alumnus. [14] Was a Jesuit novice only for the duration of his presidency. [13] [11]
8 Francis Neale SJ1809–1812 [11]
9 Giovanni Antonio Grassi SJ1812–1817Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Mission (1812–1817); Provincial Superior of the Jesuit Province of Turin (1831–1835); Rector of the Pontificio Collegio Urbano de Propaganda Fide (1840–1842). [15] Sometimes referred to as Georgetown's "second founder." [16] [11]
10 Benedict Joseph Fenwick SJ1817 Bishop of Boston (1825–1846). [9] Georgetown alumnus. [17] [11]
11 Anthony Kohlmann SJ1817–1820 Apostolic Administrator of New York (1810–1815); Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Mission (1817–1819); [18] President of the Washington Seminary (1820–1824). [19] [11]
12 Enoch Fenwick SJ1820–1825 [11]
13 Benedict Joseph Fenwick SJ1825Acting president [11]
14 Stephen Larigaudelle Dubuisson SJ1825–1826Georgetown alumnus [20] [11]
15 William Feiner SJ1826–1829 [11]
16 John W. Beschter SJ1829 [11]
17 Thomas F. Mulledy SJ1829–1838Provincial Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Province (1837–1840); [12] President of the College of the Holy Cross (1843–1845). [21] Georgetown alumnus. [22] [11]
18 William McSherry SJ1838–1839Provincial Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Province (1833–1837, 1839). [12] Georgetown alumnus. [23] [11]
19 Joseph A. Lopez SJ1839–1840Acting president. First Latin American college president in the United States. [24] [11]
20 James A. Ryder SJ1840–1845Provincial Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Province (1843–1845); [12] President of the College of the Holy Cross (1845–1848); President of Saint Joseph's College (1856–1857). [25] Georgetown alumnus. [26] [11]
21 Samuel Mulledy SJ1845Georgetown alumnus [27] [11]
22 Thomas F. Mulledy SJ1845–1848 [11]
23 James A. Ryder SJ1848–1851 [11]
24 Charles H. Stonestreet SJ1851–1852Provincial Superior of the Jesuit Maryland Province (1852–1858); [12] President of Gonzaga College (1858–1860). [28] Georgetown alumnus. [29] [11]
25 Bernard A. Maguire SJ1852–1858Georgetown alumnus [30] [11]
26 John Early SJ1858–1865President of the College of the Holy Cross (1848–1851); President of Loyola College in Maryland (1852–1858, 1866–1870). [31] Georgetown alumnus. [32] [11]
27 Bernard A. Maguire SJ1866–1870 [11]
28 John Early SJ1870–1873 [11]
29 Patrick Francis Healy SJ1873–1882First black American to become a Jesuit, earn a Ph.D. and become the president of a predominantly white American university. [33] Sometimes referred to as Georgetown's "second founder." [34] [11]
30 James A. Doonan SJ1882–1888Georgetown alumnus [35] [11]
31 J. Havens Richards SJ1888–1898 [11]
32 John D. Whitney SJ1898–1901 [36]
33 Jerome Daugherty SJ1901–1905 [36]
34 David Hillhouse Buel SJ1905–1908 [36]
35 Joseph J. Himmel SJ1908–1912Rector of St. Andrew-on-Hudson (1915–1921) [37] [36]
36 Alphonsus J. Donlon SJ1912–1918Georgetown alumnus [38] [36]
37 John B. Creeden SJ1918–1924 [36]
38 Charles W. Lyons SJ1924–1928Rector of Gonzaga College (1908–1909); President of Saint Joseph's College (1909–1914); President of Boston College (1914–1919) [39] [36]
39 W. Coleman Nevils SJ1928–1935President of the University of Scranton (1942–1947) [40] [36]
40 Arthur A. O'Leary SJ1935–1942 [36]
41 Lawrence C. Gorman SJ1942–1949 [36]
42 J. Hunter Guthrie SJ1949–1952 [36]
43 Edward B. Bunn SJ1952–1964President of Loyola College in Maryland (1938–1947) [41] [42]
44 Gerard J. Campbell SJ1964–1968 [42]
45 Robert J. Henle SJ1969–1976 [42]
46 Timothy S. Healy SJ1976–1989President of the New York Public Library (1989–1992) [43] [42]
47 Leo J. O'Donovan SJ1989–2001Georgetown alumnus [44] [42]
48 John J. DeGioia 2001–presentFirst lay president of a Jesuit university in the United States. [45] Georgetown alumnus. [4] [42]

See also

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Bernard A. Maguire Irish-American Jesuit priest

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William McSherry 19th-century American Jesuit priest

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Joseph A. Lopez Mexican Jesuit priest

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John W. Beschter Luxembourg Jesuit missionary

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Samuel Mulledy 19th-century American Jesuit priest

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William Feiner German Jesuit missionary

William Feiner was a German Catholic priest and Jesuit who became a missionary to the United States and eventually the president of Georgetown College, now known as Georgetown University.

Enoch Fenwick was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit, who ministered throughout Maryland and became the president of Georgetown College. Descending from one of the original Catholic settlers of the British Maryland Province, he studied at Georgetown College in Washington, D.C. Like his brother and future bishop, Benedict Joseph Fenwick, he entered the priesthood, studying at St. Mary's Seminary, before entering the Society of Jesus, which was suppressed at the time. He was made rector of St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral in Baltimore by Archbishop John Carroll, and remained in the position for ten years. Near the end of his pastorate, he was also made vicar general of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, which involved traveling to say Mass in remote parishes throughout rural Maryland.

References

Citations

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Sources