Makin' Whoopee

Last updated
"Makin' Whoopee"
Song
Published1928
Released1928 (1928)
Genre Jazz, blues
Songwriter(s) Gus Kahn
Composer(s) Walter Donaldson

"Makin' Whoopee" is a jazz/blues song, first popularized by Eddie Cantor in the 1928 musical Whoopee! . Gus Kahn wrote the lyrics and Walter Donaldson composed the music for the song as well as for the entire musical.

Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz is seen by many as "America's classical music". Since the 1920s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American and European-American musical parentage with a performance orientation. Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music. Intellectuals around the world have hailed jazz as "one of America's original art forms".

Blues is a music genre and musical form which was originated in the Deep South of the United States around the 1870s by African Americans from roots in African musical traditions, African-American work songs, spirituals, and the folk music of white Americans of European heritage. Blues incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads. The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common. Blue notes, usually thirds or fifths flattened in pitch, are also an essential part of the sound. Blues shuffles or walking bass reinforce the trance-like rhythm and form a repetitive effect known as the groove.

Song composition for voice(s)

A song is a single work of music that is typically intended to be sung by the human voice with distinct and fixed pitches and patterns using sound and silence and a variety of forms that often include the repetition of sections. Through semantic widening, a broader sense of the word "song" may refer to instrumentals.

Contents

The title is a euphemism for sexual intimacy, [1] and the song has been called a "dire warning", largely to men, about the "trap" of marriage. [2] "Makin' Whoopee" begins with the celebration of a wedding, honeymoon and marital bliss, but moves on to babies and responsibilities, and ultimately on to affairs and possible divorce, ending with a judge's advice.

Sexual intercourse any act of set of actions performed for reproduction, sexual pleasure or both

Sexual intercourse is principally the insertion and thrusting of the penis, usually when erect, into the vagina for sexual pleasure, reproduction, or both. This is also known as vaginal intercourse or vaginal sex. Other forms of penetrative sexual intercourse include anal sex, oral sex, fingering, and penetration by use of a dildo. These activities involve physical intimacy between two or more individuals and are usually used among humans solely for physical or emotional pleasure and can contribute to human bonding.

Wedding ceremony where people are united in marriage

A wedding is a ceremony where two people are united in marriage. Wedding traditions and customs vary greatly between cultures, ethnic groups, religions, countries, and social classes. Most wedding ceremonies involve an exchange of marriage vows by the couple, presentation of a gift, and a public proclamation of marriage by an authority figure or celebrant. Special wedding garments are often worn, and the ceremony is sometimes followed by a wedding reception. Music, poetry, prayers or readings from religious texts or literature are also commonly incorporated into the ceremony, as well as superstitious customs originating in Ancient Rome.

A honeymoon is a vacation taken by newlyweds immediately after their wedding, to celebrate their marriage. Today, honeymoons are often celebrated in destinations considered exotic or romantic.

Other versions

George Olsen bandleader

George Edward Olsen, Sr. was an American band-leader. Born in Portland, Oregon, he played the drums and attended the University of Michigan, where he was drum major. There he formed his band, George Olsen and his Music, which continued in the Portland area. He then made the cross-county transition to Broadway, appearing in Kid Boots, the Ziegfeld Follies of 1924, and Good News.

Bing Crosby American singer and actor

Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby was an American singer and actor. The first multimedia star, Crosby was a leader in record sales, radio ratings, and motion picture grosses from 1931 to 1954. His early career coincided with recording innovations that allowed him to develop an intimate singing style that influenced many male singers who followed him, including Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Dick Haymes, and Dean Martin. Yank magazine said that he was "the person who had done the most for the morale of overseas servicemen" during World War II. In 1948, American polls declared him the "most admired man alive", ahead of Jackie Robinson and Pope Pius XII. Also in 1948, Music Digest estimated that his recordings filled more than half of the 80,000 weekly hours allocated to recorded radio music.

Paul Whiteman American jazz musician and radio personality

Paul Samuel Whiteman was an American bandleader, composer, orchestral director, and violist.

In advertising

Pepsi used the melody of "Makin' Whoopee" with new lyrics, sung by Joanie Sommers, for its advertising campaign "Now It's Pepsi -- For Those Who Think Young" starting in 1961. [14]

Pepsi is a carbonated soft drink manufactured by PepsiCo. Originally created and developed in 1893 by Caleb Bradham and introduced as Brad's Drink, it was renamed as Pepsi-Cola on August 28, 1898, and then as Pepsi in 1961.

Joanie Sommers American singer

Joanie Sommers is an American singer and actress with a career concentrating on jazz, standards and popular material and show-business credits. Once billed as "The Voice of the Sixties", and associated with top-notch arrangers, songwriters and producers, Sommers' popular reputation became closely tied to her biggest, yet most uncharacteristic, hit song, "Johnny Get Angry".

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References

  1. "Whoopee". Merriam-Webster. Webster.com. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2006-10-08.
  2. Holden, Stephen (April 19, 2002). "Crooning About the Woes of Whoopee". The New York Times. Retrieved 2006-10-08. A review of a James Naughton cabaret performance. "Mr. Naughton pounces on the dire warning to men lurking beneath the song's playful surface: that once the honeymoon is over, marriage can become a trap from which there is no escape."
  3. Cool Cole, The King Cole Trio Story, Proper Records, 2001
  4. Nature Boy, Nat King Cole, Living Era, 2003
  5. "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved April 30, 2017.
  6. 10CD-set Bing Crosby, CD 1 Early Bing Vol. 1, Mebran Music Ltd. (2008), ISBN   978-3-86860-027-8
  7. "Music | Original Columbia LP "I'll See You In My Dreams" [1951]". DorisDayTribute.com. 1951-12-14. Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  8. "Music | Original Columbia LP "Cuttin' Capers" [1959]". DorisDayTribute.com. 1959-03-09. Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  9. "Frank Sinatra Album List : Release Date Ascending". Sinatrafamily.com. Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  10. "Mercury Records Discography: 1956". Jazzdisco.org. Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  11. ""M*A*S*H" Dear Dad.... Three (TV episode 1973)". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  12. "The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989)". Internet Movie Database . Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  13. ""NewsRadio" Stupid Holiday Charity Talent Show (1997)". Internet Movie Database . Retrieved 2019-03-15.
  14. "Pepsi-Cola Uses Old 'Whoopee' Hit as Jingle Theme". Billboard Music Week . 1961-02-13. p. 36. Retrieved 2016-11-17.