Master of the Jewel Office

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The Master of the Jewel Office was a position in the Royal Households of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and the United Kingdom. The office holder was responsible for running the Jewel House, which houses the Crown Jewels. This role has, at various points in history, been called Master or Treasurer of the Jewel House, Master or Keeper of the Crown Jewels, Master or Keeper of the Regalia, and Keeper of the Jewel House. In 1967, the role was combined with Resident Governor of the Tower of London. [1]

Incumbents

For subsequent appointments see Resident Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House

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References

  1. Holmes; Sitwell, p. v. "It would perhaps be appropriate at this stage to mention that the in 1967 the Jewel House in the Tower and the staff was increased and reorganised. The Officer-in-Charge is now also the Resident Governor - the two posts having been merged under the title of Resident Governor and Keeper of the Jewel House. He is an officer of the Royal Household and is responsible, only as far a custody of the Crown Jewels in the Tower is concerned, to the Lord Chamberlain of the Royal Household, who has had control of the Jewel House since 1782."
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Sir George Younghusband (1919). The Crown Jewels of England. Cassel & Co. pp. 80–81.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 Martin Holmes; Major-General H. D. W. Sitwell (1972). The English Regalia: Rheir History, Custody and Display. H.M. Stationery Office. pp. 79–80. ISBN   978-0-1167-0407-8.
  4. 1 2 Chrimes, Stanley Bertram (1972). Henry VII. London: Eyre Methuen.
  5. Alsop, J. D. "Aucher, Sir Anthony". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/68012.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. 1 2 Kinney, Arthur F. (1973). Titled Elizabethans: A Directory of Elizabethan Court, State, and Church Officers, 1558-1603. North Haven, Connecticut: Shoe String Press.
  7. Kelsey, Sean. "Cary, Henry". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4837.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. Peacey, J. T. "Mildmay, Henry". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/18695.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)