Merewith

Last updated
Merewith
Bishop of Wells
Elected c. 1024
Term endedApril 1033
Predecessor Brihtwine
Successor Duduc
Other posts Abbot of Glastonbury
Orders
Consecrationc. 1024
Personal details
DiedApril 1033

Merewith [lower-alpha 1] was an Anglo-Saxon Bishop of Wells. He was abbot of Glastonbury Abbey [2] prior to being consecrated bishop about 1024. He died on either 11 April or 12 April 1033. [3]

Anglo-Saxons Germanic tribes who started to inhabit parts of Great Britain from the 5th century onwards

The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century, and the direct ancestors of the majority of the modern British people. They comprise people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language; the cultural foundations laid by the Anglo-Saxons are the foundation of the modern English legal system and of many aspects of English society; the modern English language owes over half its words – including the most common words of everyday speech – to the language of the Anglo-Saxons. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest. The early Anglo-Saxon period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language. Charters and law were also established. The term Anglo-Saxon is popularly used for the language that was spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons in England and eastern Scotland between at least the mid-5th century and the mid-12th century. In scholarly use, it is more commonly called Old English.

Abbot Religious title

Abbot, meaning father, is an ecclesiastical title given to the male head of a monastery in various traditions, including Christianity. The office may also be given as an honorary title to a clergyman who is not the head of a monastery. The female equivalent is abbess.

Glastonbury Abbey former Benedictine abbey at Glastonbury

Glastonbury Abbey was a monastery in Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Its ruins, a grade I listed building and scheduled ancient monument, are open as a visitor attraction.

Contents

Notelist

  1. Brihtwig or Merehwit or Beorhtwig or Brihtwig Merewit [1]

Citations

  1. Barlow English Church p. 72
  2. Knowles, et al. Heads of Religious Houses p. 51
  3. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 222

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References

Frank Barlow was an English historian, known particularly for biographies of medieval figures.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England (PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England, in a prosopography. The PASE online database presents details of the lives of every recorded individual who lived in, or was closely connected with, Anglo-Saxon England from 597 to 1087, with specific citations to each primary source describing each factoid.

Christian titles
Preceded by
Brihtwine
Bishop of Wells
c. 1024–1033
Succeeded by
Duduc