Henry Bowet

Last updated
Henry Bowet
Archbishop of York
Appointed7 October 1407
Installedunknown
Term ended20 October 1423
Predecessor Robert Hallam
Successor Philip Morgan
Orders
Consecrationtranslated 7 October 1407
Personal details
Died20 October 1423
Cawood Palace
Buried York Minster
Denomination Roman Catholic

Henry Bowet (died 20 October 1423) was both Bishop of Bath and Wells and Archbishop of York.

Bishop of Bath and Wells Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Bath and Wells heads the Church of England Diocese of Bath and Wells in the Province of Canterbury in England.

Archbishop of York second most senior bishop of the Church of England

The Archbishop of York is a senior bishop in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. The archbishop is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, which covers the northern regions of England as well as the Isle of Man. The Archbishop of York is an ex officio member of the House of Lords and is styled Primate of England.

Contents

Life

Bowet was a royal clerk to King Richard II of England, and at one point carried letters of recommendation to Pope Urban VI from the king. [1]

Richard II of England 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Richard II, also known as Richard of Bordeaux, was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. Richard's father, Edward the Black Prince, died in 1376, leaving Richard as heir apparent to King Edward III. Upon the death of his grandfather Edward III, the 10-year-old Richard succeeded to the throne.

Pope Urban VI pope

Pope Urban VI, born Bartolomeo Prignano, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 8 April 1378 to his death in 1389. He is so far the last pope to be elected from outside the College of Cardinals. His reign, which began shortly after the end of the Avignon Papacy, was marked by immense conflict between rival factions as part of the Western Schism.

Bowet became Bishop of Bath and Wells on 19 August 1401, [2] and succeeded to the Archbishopric of York on 7 October 1407, after it had been vacant for two and a half years. [3]

The pope had already appointed Robert Hallam to the northern primacy, but, finding that Henry IV desired to see Bowet installed, he nominated Hallam to the see of Salisbury and gave the pallium to Bowet.

Robert Hallam 15th-century Archbishop of York-elect

Robert Hallam was an English churchman, Bishop of Salisbury and English representative at the Council of Constance. He was Chancellor of the University of Oxford from 1403 to 1405.

Henry IV of England 15th-century King of England

Henry IV, also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was King of England from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France.

Pallium an ecclesiastical vestment in the Catholic Church: a narrow band, seen from front or back the ornament resembles the letter Y and decorated with six black crosses

The pallium is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries bestowed by the Holy See upon metropolitans and primates as a symbol of their conferred jurisdictional authorities, and still remains papal emblems. Schoenig, Steven A., SJ. Bonds of Wool: The Pallium and Papal Power in the Middle Ages (Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2017. ISBN 978-0-8132-2922-5. In its present form, the pallium is a long and "three fingers broad" white band adornment, woven from the wool of lambs raised by Trappist monks. It is donned by looping its middle around one's neck, resting upon the chasuble and two dependent lappets over one's shoulders with tail-ends on the left with the front end crossing over the rear. When observed from the front or rear the pallium sports a stylistic letter 'y'. It is decorated with six black crosses, one near each end and four spaced out around the neck loop. At times the pallium is embellished fore and aft with three gold gem-headed stickpins. The doubling and pinning on the left shoulder likely survive from the Roman pallium. The pallium and the omophor originate from the same vestment, the latter a much larger and wider version worn by Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic bishops of the Byzantine Rite. A theory relates origination to the paradigm of the Good Shepherd shouldering a lamb, a common early Christian art image — but this may be an explanation a posteriori, however the ritual preparation of the pallium and its subsequent bestowal upon a pope at coronation suggests the shepherd symbolism. The lambs whose fleeces are destined for pallia are solemnly presented at altar by the nuns of the convent of Saint Agnes and ultimately the Benedictine nuns of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere weave their wool into pallia.

In 1402 Bowet briefly served as Lord High Treasurer, from February to October. [4]

Lord High Treasurer English government position

The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer was an English government position and has been a British government position since the Acts of Union of 1707. A holder of the post would be the third-highest-ranked Great Officer of State, below the Lord High Steward and the Lord High Chancellor.

In 1417 the Scots invaded England and sat down before Berwick-on-Tweed. The Duke of Exeter marched to the relief of the town and Archbishop Bowet, then very old and feeble, had himself carried into the camp where his addresses are said to have greatly encouraged the English soldiers. The Scots decamped hastily in the night, leaving behind them their stores and baggage. [5]

Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter English military commander

Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter was an English military commander during the Hundred Years' War, and briefly Chancellor of England. He was the third of the four children born to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and his mistress Katherine Swynford. To overcome their problematic parentage, his parents were married in 1396, and he and his siblings were legitimated on two separate occasions, in 1390 and again in 1397. He married the daughter of Sir Thomas Neville of Hornby, Margaret Neville, who bore him one son, Henry Beaufort. However, the child died young.

Bowet died on 20 October 1423 [3] at Cawood Bishop's Palace and was buried in his cathedral of York Minster.

Citations

  1. Chaplais English Diplomatic Practice p. 138
  2. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 228
  3. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 282
  4. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 106
  5. Allmand Henry V p. 341

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References

Political offices
Preceded by
Laurence Allerthorp
Lord High Treasurer
1402
Succeeded by
Guy Mone
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John Colton
Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin
1382–1391
Succeeded by
Thomas de Everdon
Preceded by
Richard Clifford
Bishop of Bath and Wells
1401–1407
Succeeded by
Nicholas Bubwith
Preceded by
Robert Hallam
Archbishop of York
1407–1423
Succeeded by
Philip Morgan