Robert Waldby

Last updated
Robert Waldby
Archbishop of York
Appointed5 October 1396
Term ended6 January 1398
Predecessor Thomas Arundel
Successor Richard le Scrope
Other posts Archbishop of Dublin
Bishop of Chichester
Personal details
Died29 December 1397
Buried Westminster Abbey
Denomination Roman Catholic

Robert Waldby (died 1397) was a native of York and friar of the Order of Saint Augustine who followed Edward, the Black Prince into Aquitaine. After studying at Toulouse, he became professor of theology there.

There is a possibility Waldby was Bishop of Sodor and Man in 1381, although at the time John Dongan was the bishop from 1374 to 1391. He definitely became Bishop of Aire in Gascony in 1387, and translated to the archbishopric of Dublin in Ireland on 14 November 1390. [1] Five years later he translated to the bishopric of Chichester in England on 25 October 1395, [2] and finally became Archbishop of York on 5 October 1396. [3]

Waldby died on 29 December 1397 with his bishopric being sede vacante on 6 January 1398. [3] [4] He was buried in the Chapel of St. Edmund in Westminster Abbey, where his monumental brass still remains. [5] [6]

Citations

  1. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology, p. 351
  2. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology, p. 239
  3. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology, p. 282
  4. Jones Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae pp. 35
  5. Thornbury Old and New London pp. 341350
  6. "Robert Waldeby". Westminster Abbey. Retrieved 17 January 2017.

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References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Jean de Montaut
Bishop of Aire
1386–1390
Succeeded by
Maurice Usk
Preceded by
Robert Wikeford
Archbishop of Dublin
1390–1395
Succeeded by
Richard Northalis
Preceded by
Richard Mitford
Bishop of Chichester
1395–1397
Succeeded by
Robert Reade
Preceded by
Thomas Arundel
Archbishop of York
1397–1398
Succeeded by
Richard le Scrope