Ralph Neville

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  1. Henry was crowned king on 28 October 1216, at the age of 9. [11]
  2. This dispensation allowed Neville to be ordained a priest, as priests were required by canon law to be legitimate. [17]
  3. Henry III was declared of age for some purposes in 1223, but did not totally assume control of the government until 1227. [11] De Burgh was ousted from power in 1232. [23]
  4. The regent during this absence was Walter de Gray, the Archbishop of York. [11]

Citations

  1. Clanchy From Memory to Written Record p. 90
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Cazel "Neville, Ralph de" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  3. 1 2 Vincent "Origins of the Chancellorship" English Historical Review pp. 111–112
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 Greenway "Bishops" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 5: Chichester
  5. Young Making of the Neville Family p. xiii
  6. Vincent "Origins of the Chancellorship" English Historical Review pp. 109–110
  7. Young Making of the Neville Family p. 35
  8. Greenway "Chancellors" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 5: Chichester
  9. Vincent Peter des Roches p. 477
  10. Clanchy England and its Rulers p. 192
  11. 1 2 3 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology pp. 37–38
  12. 1 2 3 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 85
  13. Powell and Wallis House of Lords p. 173
  14. Carpenter Minority of Henry III pp. 94–95
  15. 1 2 3 4 Chrimes Introduction pp. 109–114
  16. Carpenter Minority of Henry III pp. 128–131
  17. Barber Two Cities p. 28
  18. 1 2 Young Making of the Neville Family pp. 67–68
  19. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 239
  20. Carpenter Minority of Henry III pp. 301–302
  21. Carpenter Minority of Henry III pp. 321–322
  22. Chrimes Introduction p. 87
  23. Clanchy England and its Rulers p. 203
  24. Vincent Peter des Roches p. 297
  25. Pegues "Clericus in Legal Administration" English Historical Review p. 538
  26. Carpenter Struggle for Mastery pp. 351–352
  27. Moorman Church Life pp. 164–165
  28. Young Making of the Neville Family pp. 77–78
  29. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 233
  30. Clanchy From Memory to Written Record p. 229
  31. Young Making of the Neville Family p. 73
  32. Vincent Peter des Roches pp. 314–315
  33. Carpenter Struggle for Mastery p. 358
  34. Prestwich Plantagenet England pp. 88–90
  35. Warren Governance of Norman and Angevin England p. 190
  36. Maddicott Origins of the English Parliament pp. 169–170
  37. Maddicott Origins of the English Parliament p. 178
  38. Quoted in Young Making of the Neville Family p. 79
  39. Young Making of the Neville Family p. 65
  40. Moorman Church Life p. xv
  41. Prestwich Plantagenet England p. 62

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References

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  • Carpenter, David (1990). The Minority of Henry III. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. ISBN   0-520-07239-1.
  • Carpenter, David (2004). The Struggle for Mastery: The Penguin History of Britain 1066–1284. New York: Penguin. ISBN   0-14-014824-8.
  • Cazel Jr., Fred A. (2004). "Neville, Ralph de (d. 1244)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19949 . Retrieved 8 November 2007.(subscription or UK public library membership required)
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Ralph Neville
Bishop of Chichester
Province Canterbury
Electedbefore 1 November 1222
Term ended1–4 February 1244
Predecessor Ranulf of Wareham
Successor Robert Passelewe
Other post(s) Lord Chancellor
Archbishop-elect of Canterbury
Bishop-elect of Winchester
Orders
Consecration21 April 1224
Personal details
Died1–4 February 1244
London, England
Buried Chichester Cathedral
Lord Chancellor (Keeper of the Great Seal)
In office
1226–1238
Political offices
Preceded by Lord Chancellor
1226–1238
(Keeper of the Great Seal)
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Richard le Gras
(Keeper of the Great Seal)
Lord Chancellor
1242–1244
Succeeded by
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of Chichester
1224–1244
Succeeded by
Preceded by Archbishop-elect of Canterbury
1231–1232
Succeeded by
Preceded by Bishop-elect of Winchester
1238–1239
Succeeded by