Robert Braybrooke

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Robert Braybrooke
Bishop of London
Appointed9 September 1381
Term ended28 August 1404
Predecessor William Courtenay
Successor Roger Walden
Orders
Consecration5 January 1382
Personal details
Died28 August 1404
DenominationCatholic

Robert Braybrooke was a medieval Dean of Salisbury and Bishop of London.

Contents

Biography

Braybrooke was the son of Sir Gerard Braybrooke of Horsenden, Buckinghamshire & Colmworth, Bedfordshire and his wife, Isabella, the daughter of Sir Roger Dakeny of Clophill.[ citation needed ] He was nominated 9 September 1381 and consecrated on 5 January 1382. [1]

Braybrooke was named Lord Chancellor of England on 20 September 1382 and was out of the office by 11 July 1383. [2]

Braybrooke accompanied King Richard II to Ireland in 1394 and was Lord Chancellor of Ireland for six months in 1397.

Braybrooke died on 28 August 1404, [1] and was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral. His tomb was smashed during the Great Fire of London in 1666, and his body was found inside intact and mummified. [3]

See also

Citations

  1. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 258
  2. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 87
  3. Pepys, Samuel (12 November 2019). "In the Convocation House Yard we did see the body of Robert Braybrooke, Bishop of London, that died 1404. He fell down in his tomb out of the great church into St. Fayth's this late fire, and is here seen his skeleton with the flesh on; but all tough like a spongy dry leather". @samuelpepys. Retrieved 12 November 2019.

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References

Political offices
Preceded by
William Trussel
Secretary of State (England) Succeeded by
John Rrofit
Preceded by Lord Chancellor
1382–1383
Succeeded by
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of London
1381–1404
Succeeded by