Richard FitzNeal

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  1. Or FitzNeale, FitzNigel, sometimes called Richard of Ely

Citations

  1. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 103
  2. 1 2 Greenway Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300: Volume 1, St. Paul's, London: Prebendaries: Chiswick
  3. Prebendaries 1092 to 1842 – Aylesbury accessed on 3 September 2007
  4. Quoted in Clanchy From Memory to Written Record p. 19
  5. Clanchy From Memory to Written Record p. 25
  6. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 258
  7. Greenway Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300: Volume 1, St. Paul's, London: Bishops
  8. Turner "Roman Law" Journal of British Studies p. 14

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References

  • Clanchy, C. T. (1993). From Memory to Written Record: England 1066–1307 (Second ed.). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing. ISBN   978-0-631-16857-7.
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1968). "Bishops". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300. Vol. 1, St. Paul's, London. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 28 October 2007.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1968). "Prebenderies: Chiswick". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300. Vol. 1, St. Paul's, London. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 28 October 2007.
  • Turner, Ralph V. (Autumn 1975). "Roman Law in England Before the Time of Bracton". Journal of British Studies . 15 (1): 1–25. doi:10.1086/385676. JSTOR   175236. S2CID   159948800.

Further reading

Richard FitzNeal
Bishop of London
Appointed15 November 1189
Term ended10 September 1198
Predecessor Gilbert Foliot
Successor William of Sainte-Mère-Eglise
Other post(s) Dean of Lincoln
Orders
Consecration31 December 1189
Personal details
Born c. 1130
Died10 September 1198 (aged c. 68)
DenominationCatholic
4th Lord Treasurer
In office
1156–1196
Political offices
Preceded by Lord Treasurer
1159–1196
Succeeded by
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of London
1189–1198
Succeeded by