Roger Martival

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Roger Martival
Bishop of Salisbury

Salisburycathedralrogermartivaltomb.jpg

Martival's tomb in Salisbury Cathedral
Elected about 11 June 1315
Term ended 14 March 1330
Predecessor Simon of Ghent
Successor Robert Wyvil
Orders
Consecration 28 September 1315
Personal details
Died 14 March 1330
Denomination Catholic

Roger Martival (died 14 March 1330) was a medieval Bishop of Salisbury in England.

The Bishop of Salisbury is the ordinary of the Church of England's Diocese of Salisbury in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers much of the counties of Wiltshire and Dorset. The see is in the City of Salisbury where the bishop's seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The current bishop is Nick Holtam, the 78th Bishop of Salisbury, who was consecrated at St Paul's Cathedral on 22 July 2011 and enthroned in Salisbury Cathedral on 15 October 2011.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Martival was Archdeacon of Huntingdon (1286–1295), Archdeacon of Leicester (1295–1310) [1] and Dean of Lincoln (1310–1315). From 1293–4, he was Chancellor of the University of Oxford. [2]

The Archdeacon of Leicester is a senior ecclesiastical officer in the Church of England.

Dean of Lincoln list article

The Dean of Lincoln is the head of the Chapter of Lincoln Cathedral in the city of Lincoln, England in the Church of England Diocese of Lincoln. Christine Wilson was installed as Dean on 22 October 2016.

University of Oxford Collegiate research university in Oxford, England

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two 'ancient universities' are frequently jointly referred to as 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Martival was elected as Bishop of Salisbury about 11 June 1315 and consecrated on 28 September 1315. He died 14 March 1330. [3] He has a house named for him at Bishop Wordsworth's School, Salisbury. [4]

Bishop Wordsworths School

Bishop Wordsworth's School is a Church of England boys' grammar school in Salisbury, Wiltshire for boys aged 11 to 18. The school is regularly amongst the top-performing schools in England, and in 2010 was the school with the best results in the English Baccalaureate. It was granted academy status in March 2011 and is an Additional Member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. It is located on the grounds of Salisbury Cathedral, adjacent to the Cathedral School. It has five houses, Poore, Osmund, Jewell, Martival and Ward.

Salisbury Cathedral city in Wiltshire, England

Salisbury is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England, with a population of 40,302, at the confluence of the rivers Avon, Nadder, Ebble, Wylye and Bourne. The city is approximately 20 miles (32 km) from Southampton and 30 miles (48 km) from Bath.

Citations

  1. "Archdeacons- Leicester". British History Online. Retrieved 2012-01-15.
  2. Hibbert, Christopher, ed. (1988). "Appendix 5: Chancellors of the University". The Encyclopaedia of Oxford . Macmillan. pp. 521–522. ISBN   0-333-39917-X.
  3. Fryde, et al., Handbook of British Chronology, p. 270.
  4. "Bishop Wordsworth's School". www.bws-school.org.uk. Retrieved 2018-05-06.

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References

Cambridge City and non-metropolitan district in England

Cambridge is a university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of London. At the United Kingdom Census 2011, its population was 123,867 including 24,506 students. Cambridge became an important trading centre during the Roman and Viking ages, and there is archaeological evidence of settlement in the area as early as the Bronze Age. The first town charters were granted in the 12th century, although modern city status was not officially conferred until 1951.

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world. It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Academic offices
Preceded by
Henry Swayne?
or Simon of Ghent
Chancellor of the University of Oxford
1293–1294
Succeeded by
Peter de Medburn
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Simon of Ghent
Bishop of Salisbury
1315–1330
Succeeded by
Robert Wyvil