Lionel Woodville

Last updated

Lionel Woodville
Bishop of Salisbury
Appointed7 January 1482
Term endedc.23 June 1484
Predecessor Richard Beauchamp
Successor Thomas Langton
Orders
Consecration21 April 1482
by  Thomas Cardinal Bourchier
Personal details
Bornc. 1446
Diedc. 23 June 1484, c. 38 years old
DenominationCatholic
Coat of arms WoodvilleArms.png

Lionel Woodville (1447 – 23 June 1484) was a Bishop of Salisbury in England.

Contents

Life

Woodville was a fourth son of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquetta of Luxembourg; his siblings included Elizabeth Woodville, Queen Consort from 1464 to 1483.

In the late 1470s, Woodville became the first person in recorded history to receive an honorary degree (DCL), from the University of Oxford. [1] He was Chancellor of the University of Oxford from 1479 to 1483.

After a number of more minor clerical positions, Woodville was elected Dean of Exeter in November 1478, and held the position until 1482, when he became Bishop of Salisbury. [2] He was nominated to Salisbury on 7 January 1482 and consecrated on 21 April 1482. [3]

Woodville died about 23 June 1484. [3]

Citations

  1. "Home".
  2. Plea Rolls of the Court of Common Pleas: CP 40/887, in 1484, {Latin} first defendant, surname as 'Wydevill', in the top entry, in a case of debt; http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT3/R3/CP40no887/bCP40no887dorses/IMG_1041.htm  ; {both Oxford & Salisbury are mentioned}
  3. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 271

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Thomas Bourchier (cardinal)</span> 15th-century Archbishop of Canterbury, Chancellor of England, and cardinal

Thomas Bourchier was a medieval English cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor of England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Kemp</span> 15th-century Archbishop of Canterbury, Chancellor of England, and cardinal

John Kemp was a medieval English cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor of England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert Hallam</span> 15th-century Archbishop of York-elect

Robert Hallam was an English churchman, Bishop of Salisbury and English representative at the Council of Constance. He was Chancellor of the University of Oxford from 1403 to 1405.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Thomas Rotherham</span> 15th-century Archbishop of York and Chancellor of England

Thomas Rotherham, also known as Thomas (Scot) de Rotherham, was an English cleric and statesman. He served as bishop of several dioceses, most notably as Archbishop of York and, on two occasions as Lord Chancellor. He is considered a venerable figure in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, his town of birth.

Robert Stillington was an English cleric and administrator who was Bishop of Bath and Wells from 1465 and twice served as Lord Chancellor under King Edward IV. In 1483 he was instrumental in the accession of King Richard III, leading to later reprisals against him under King Henry VII.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Stafford (bishop)</span> 15th-century English archbishop and statesman

John Stafford was a medieval English prelate and statesman who served as Lord Chancellor (1432–1450) and as Archbishop of Canterbury (1443–1452).

Thomas Charlton was Bishop of Hereford, Lord High Treasurer of England, Lord Privy Seal, and Lord Chancellor of Ireland. He is buried in Hereford Cathedral in Hereford, Herefordshire, England.

Marmaduke Lumley was an English priest, Bishop of Carlisle from 1429 to 1450, and Knight Commander of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. He was a son of Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley and Eleanor de Neville. He was elected about 5 December 1429, and consecrated on 16 April 1430. He was Bishop of Lincoln for a short time before his death in December 1450. He was educated at University of Cambridge and was appointed Precentor of Lincoln Cathedral in 1425. He also became Chancellor of the University of Cambridge in 1427 and was Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge from 1429 to 1443. From 1446 to 1449 he served as Lord High Treasurer of England. Lumley's tenure as Lord High Treasurer occurred during the Great Bullion Famine and the Great Slump in England.

William Alnwick was an English Catholic clergyman. He was Bishop of Norwich (1426–1436) and Bishop of Lincoln (1436–1449).

Thomas Brunce was a 15th-century Bishop of Rochester and then Bishop of Norwich.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bishop of Rochester</span> Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Rochester is the ordinary of the Church of England's Diocese of Rochester in the Province of Canterbury.

John Fordham was Bishop of Durham and Bishop of Ely.

Ralph Ergham was the English bishop of Salisbury from 1375 to 1388, and then bishop of Bath and Wells from 1388 to 1400.

Edmund Audley was Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Salisbury.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Harewell</span> 14th-century Bishop of Bath and Wells

John Harewell was a Bishop of Bath and Wells in medieval England.

Nicholas Bubwith (1355-1424) was a Bishop of London, Bishop of Salisbury and Bishop of Bath and Wells as well as Lord Privy Seal and Lord High Treasurer of England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edmund Stafford</span> 14th and 15th-century Bishop of Exeter and Chancellor of England

Edmund Stafford was Bishop of Exeter from 1395 to his death in 1419.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edmund Lacey</span> 15th-century Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Hereford

Edmund Lacey was a medieval Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Exeter in England.

Events from the 1480s in England. This decade marks the beginning of the Tudor period.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bishop of St Davids</span> Welsh bishop

The Bishop of St Davids is the ordinary of the Church in Wales Diocese of St Davids.

References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of Salisbury
1482–1484
Succeeded by
Academic offices
Preceded by Chancellor of the University of Oxford
1479–1483
Succeeded by