Roger of Salisbury

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  1. 1 2 3 Greenway 1991, pp. 1–7.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Chisholm 1911, p. 454.
  3. 1 2 Kemp 2004.
  4. Fryde et al. 1996, p. 83.
  5. 1 2 Fryde et al. 1996, p. 270.
  6. Fryde et al. 1996, p. 70.
  7. Williams 2000, p. 211.
  8. Green 2002, p. 189.

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Further reading

Roger of Salisbury
Bishop of Salisbury
Monument of Roger, Bishop of Salisbury (died 1139).jpg
Monument of Roger, Bishop of Salisbury (died 1139), in his cathedral church.
Appointed29 September 1102
Term ended11 December 1139
Predecessor Osmund
Successor Henry de Sully
Orders
Consecration11 August 1107
Personal details
Died11 December 1139
Salisbury
DenominationCatholic
Chief Justiciar of England (de facto)
In office
?–1139
Political offices
Preceded by
None (disputed)
Chief Justiciar
Held the office without the title
Succeeded by
Preceded by Lord Chancellor
1101–1102
Succeeded by
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of Salisbury
1102–1139
Succeeded by