Roger Walden

Last updated
Roger Walden
Archbishop of Canterbury
Appointed8 November 1397
Installedunknown
Term ended19 October 1399
Predecessor Thomas Arundel
Successor Thomas Arundel
Orders
Consecrationnever consecrated
Personal details
Died6 January 1406
Denomination Roman Catholic

Roger Walden (died 1406) was an English treasurer and Bishop of London.

Contents

Life

Little is now known of Walden's birth nor of his early years. He had some connection with the Channel Islands, and resided for some time in Jersey where he was rector of the Parish Church of St Helier from 1371 to 1378. He then held livings in Yorkshire and in Leicestershire before he became Archdeacon of Winchester in 1387. His days, however, were by no means fully occupied with his ecclesiastical duties, and in 1387 also he was appointed Treasurer of Calais, holding about the same time other positions in this neighbourhood.

Channel Islands archipelago in the English Channel

The Channel Islands are an archipelago in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two Crown dependencies: the Bailiwick of Jersey, which is the largest of the islands; and the Bailiwick of Guernsey, consisting of Guernsey, Alderney, Sark and some smaller islands. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy and, although they are not part of the United Kingdom, the UK is responsible for the defence and international relations of the islands. The Crown dependencies are not members of the Commonwealth of Nations or of the European Union. They have a total population of about 164,541, and the bailiwicks' capitals, Saint Helier and Saint Peter Port, have populations of 33,500 and 18,207, respectively. The total area of the islands is 198 km2.

Jersey British Crown Dependency in the Channel Islands

Jersey, officially the Bailiwick of Jersey, is a Crown dependency located near the coast of Normandy, France. Jersey was part of the Duchy of Normandy, whose dukes went on to become kings of England from 1066. After Normandy was lost by the kings of England in the 13th century, and the ducal title surrendered to France, Jersey and the other Channel Islands remained attached to the English crown.

A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations. In contrast, a vicar is also a cleric but functions as an assistant and representative of an administrative leader. The term comes from the Latin for the helmsman of a ship.

In 1395, after having served Richard II as secretary, Walden became treasurer of England, [1] adding the deanery of York to his numerous other benefices. On 8 November 1397 he was chosen Archbishop of Canterbury in succession to Thomas Arundel, [2] who had just been banished from the realm, but he lost this position when the new king Henry IV restored Arundel in 1399, and after a short imprisonment he passed into retirement, being, as he himself says, "in the dust and under feet of men."

Richard II of England 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Richard II, also known as Richard of Bordeaux, was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. Richard, a son of Edward the Black Prince, was born in Bordeaux during the reign of his grandfather, Edward III. His father was Prince of Aquitaine. Richard was the younger brother of Edward of Angoulême, upon whose death Richard, at three years of age, became second in line to the throne after his father. Upon the death of Richard's father prior to the death of Edward III, Richard, by primogeniture, became the heir apparent to the throne. With Edward III's death the following year, Richard succeeded to the throne at the age of ten.

The Dean of York is the member of the clergy who is responsible for the running of the York Minster cathedral. As well as being the head of the cathedral church of the diocese and the metropolitical church of the province, the Dean of York holds preeminence as the Vicar of the Northern Province.

A benefice or living is a reward received in exchange for services rendered and as a retainer for future services. The Roman Empire used the Latin term beneficium as a benefit to an individual from the Empire for services rendered. Its use was adopted by the Western Church in the Carolingian Era as a benefit bestowed by the crown or church officials. A benefice specifically from a church is called a precaria such as a stipend and one from a monarch or nobleman is usually called a fief. A benefice is distinct from an allod, in that an allod is property owned outright, not bestowed by a higher authority.

On 10 December 1405, through Arundel's influence, Walden was elected Bishop of London, and he died at Much Hadham in Hertfordshire on 6 January 1406. [3] He was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral. [4] An Historia Mundi, the manuscript of which is in the British Museum, is sometimes regarded as the work of Walden; but this was doubtless written by an earlier writer.

Bishop of London third most senior bishop of the Church of England

The Bishop of London is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury.

Much Hadham farm village in the United Kingdom

Much Hadham, formerly known as Great Hadham, is a village and civil parish in the district of East Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire, England. The parish of Much Hadham contains the hamlets of Perry Green and Green Tye, as well as the village of Much Hadham itself. It covers 4,490 acres (1,820 ha). The village of Much Hadham is situated midway between Ware and Bishop's Stortford. The population of the parish was recorded as 2,862 in the 2011 census, an increase from 1,994 in 2001.

Hertfordshire County of England

Hertfordshire is one of the home counties in England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire to the north, Cambridgeshire to the north-east, Essex to the east, Buckinghamshire to the west and Greater London to the south. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region.

Citations

  1. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 106
  2. Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 233
  3. Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 258
  4. DNB: Roger Walden

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References

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<i>Encyclopædia Britannica</i> Eleventh Edition 11th edition of Encyclopædia Britannica

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Political offices
Preceded by
John Waltham
Lord High Treasurer
1395–1398
Succeeded by
Guy Mone
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Thomas Arundel
Archbishop of Canterbury
1398–1399
Succeeded by
Thomas Arundel
Preceded by
Robert Braybrooke
Bishop of London
1405–1406
Succeeded by
Nicholas Bubwith