John Crakehall

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  1. 1 2 3 4 Greenway "Archdeacons: Bedford" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300 Volume 3, Lincoln
  2. 1 2 3 4 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology pp. 103-104
  3. 1 2 Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 83
  4. Burger Bishops, Clerks, and Diocesan Governance p. 192
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Jobson "Crakehall, John of" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  6. Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 84
  7. 1 2 Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 87
  8. 1 2 3 Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 85
  9. 1 2 Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 89
  10. Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 86
  11. Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 88
  12. Ambler "On Kingship and Tyranny" Thirteenth Century England XIV p. 124
  13. 1 2 Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 90-91
  14. Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 93
  15. Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII pp. 93–94
  16. Ambler Bishops in the Political Community p. 157
  17. Greenway "Prebendaries: Rugmere" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300 Volume 1, St. Paul's, London
  18. Hamilton Religion in the Medieval West pp. 34–35
  19. Jobson "John of Crakehall" Thirteenth Century England XIII p. 96

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References

  • Ambler, S. T. (2017). Bishops in the Political Community of England, 1213-1272. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ISBN   9780198754022.
  • Ambler, Sophie (2013). "On Kingship and Tyranny: Grosseteste's Memorandum and its Place in the Baronial Reform Movement". In Burton, Janet; Schofield, Phillipp; Weiler, Björn (eds.). Thirteenth Century England XIV: Proceedings of the Aberystwyth and Lampeter Conference 2011. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press. pp. 115–128. ISBN   978-1-84383-809-8.
  • Burger, Michael (2012). Bishops, Clerks, and Diocesan Governance in Thirteenth-Century England: Reward and Punishment. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-1-107-02214-0.
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1968). "Prebendaries: Rugmere". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300. Vol. 1, St. Paul's, London. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 9 January 2017.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1977). "Archdeacons: Bedford". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300. Vol. 3, Lincoln. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 9 January 2017.
  • Hamilton, Bernard (2003). Religion in the Medieval West (Second ed.). London: Arnold. ISBN   0-340-80839-X.
  • Jobson, Adrian (September 2010). "Crakehall, John of (d. 1260)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 9 January 2017.(subscription or UK public library membership required)
  • Jobson, Adrian (2011). "John of Crakehall: The 'Forgotten' Baronial Treasurer, 1258–60". In Burton, Janet; Lachaud, Frédérique; Schofield, Phillipp; Stöber, Karen; Weiler, Björn (eds.). Thirteenth Century England XIII: Proceedings of the Paris Conference 2009. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press. pp. 83–99. ISBN   978-1-84383-618-6.
John Crakehall
Archdeacon of Bedford
Appointed1254
Predecessor John de Dyham [1]
Successor Peter de Audeham [1]
Personal details
Bornbefore 1210
Died c. 8 September 1260
London
Buried Waltham Abbey
Lord High Treasurer
In office
2 November 1258 c. 8 September 1260