Dean of Salisbury

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The cloisters at Salisbury Cathedral Salisbury Cathedral Cloisters.jpg
The cloisters at Salisbury Cathedral

The Dean of Salisbury is the head of the chapter of Salisbury Cathedral in the Church of England. The Dean assists the archdeacon of Sarum and bishop of Ramsbury in the diocese of Salisbury.

Contents

List of deans

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References

  1. Barlow, Frank (2004). "Chichester, Robert of (d. 1160?)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5279.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. British History Online Bishops of Norwich Archived 2012-02-14 at the Wayback Machine accessed on 14 December 2007
  3. British History Online Bishops of Ely Archived 2012-02-14 at the Wayback Machine accessed on 25 October 2007
  4. British History Online Bishops of Durham Archived 2011-07-19 at the Wayback Machine accessed on 25 October 2007
  5. "No. 27323". The London Gazette . 14 June 1901. p. 4001.
  6. "Installation of Canon Nicholas Papadopulos as Dean". Salisbury Cathedral. Archived from the original on 24 December 2018. Retrieved 24 December 2018.

Sources