Rowletts, Kentucky

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Rowletts is an unincorporated community in Hart County, Kentucky, in the United States. [1]

History

Rowletts was a station on the railroad. [2] A post office called Rowlett's Depot was established in 1860, was renamed Rowletts in 1880, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1995. [3] The community was named for John W. Rowlett, a railroad official. [4]

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References

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Rowletts, Kentucky
  2. Collins, Lewis (1877). History of Kentucky. p. 332.
  3. "Hart County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 11 January 2015.
  4. Rennick, Robert M. Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 257. ISBN   0-8131-2631-2.

Coordinates: 37°14′27″N85°53′39″W / 37.24083°N 85.89417°W / 37.24083; -85.89417