Studebaker Light Six

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1922 Studebaker Light Six Touring Car 1922 Studebaker Light Six Touring Car, Poughkeepsie (front left).jpg
1922 Studebaker Light Six Touring Car
1924 Light Six with custom coachwork Studebaker-light-six.jpg
1924 Light Six with custom coachwork

The Studebaker Light Six was a car built by the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana from 1918 to 1927.

Contents

Light Six

The Light Six originally came out in 1918.

YearEngineHPTransmissionWheelbaseTire Size
1920–1921207.1CID L-head 1-bbl. inline Six [1] 40 [2] 3-speed manual112 in (2,845 mm) [1] 32"

Studebaker Standard Six

In August, 1924, the car was renamed the Studebaker Standard Six.

While in production, the Light Six / Standard Six represented Studebaker's least expensive model. The car was available in a full array of body styles throughout its production.

Studebaker Standard Six Dictator

In 1927, the car was renamed the Studebaker Standard Six Dictator in preparation for the 1928 model year when the car would be henceforth known as the Studebaker Dictator.

Standard Six Coach specifications (1926 data)

Standard equipment

The new car price included the following items:

Optional equipment

The following equipment on new cars was available at extra charge:

Source: Slauson, Harold Whiting; Greene, Howard (1926). "Leading American Motor Cars". Everyman’s Guide to Motor Efficiency. Leslie-Judge.

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References

  1. 1 2 Kimes, Beverly (1996). standard catalog of American Cars 1805-1942. Krause publications. ISBN   0-87341-428-4.
  2. "Directory Index: Studebaker/1920 Studebaker/album". Oldcarbrochures.com. Archived from the original on 2012-09-05. Retrieved 2012-06-01.