Tincher

Last updated

The Tincher was a brand of automobile produced from 19031908 in Chicago, Illinois, [1] and from 1908 to 1909 in South Bend, Indiana. The car was named after its developer, Thomas Luther Tincher, but built by the Chicago Coach and Carriage Company [2] using components and body sections fabricated by the German Krupp steelworks. [1]

The Tincher debuted at the 1903 Chicago Automobile Show, where its air-braking system was the technical wonder of the event. Not only could the air-system stop the car, but it could be used to inflate flat tires and power the car's horn. [3]

The Tincher was also one of the costliest cars in production at the time, with a race version beginning at $12,000. Custom coach work on the touring cars and coach models could raise the price even higher. Small Tinchers, riding on a 90 in (2,300 mm) wheelbase, were priced in the $5,000 - $10,000 range.

In 1907, Tincher moved himself and the newly incorporated Tincher Motor Car Company to South Bend, Indiana, where Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company maintained its production facilities. Tincher had hoped that being near the Studebaker brothers (who were majority stock holders in the venture) would help not only development of cars and custom bodies, but sales as well.

However well built the cars were, the Tincher was discontinued in 1909 when it, and Thomas Tincher, both declared bankruptcy. Tincher then moved to Los Angeles where he became West Coast distributor of the Haynes automobile. [1]

Related Research Articles

Packard Defunct luxury automobile marque from Detroit, Michigan

Packard was an American luxury automobile marque built by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, United States. The first Packard automobiles were produced in 1899, and the last Detroit-built Packard in 1956, when they built the Packard Predictor, their last concept car.

Studebaker Former car manufacturer

Studebaker was an American wagon and automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. Founded in 1852 and incorporated in 1868 as the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company, the firm was originally a producer of wagons, buggies, carriages and harnesses.

The Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Company was an American motor vehicle manufacturer based in Buffalo, New York, which was active from 1901 to 1938. Although best known for its expensive luxury cars, Pierce-Arrow also manufactured commercial trucks, fire trucks, boats, camp trailers, motorcycles, and bicycles.

E-M-F Company

The E-M-F Company was an early American automobile manufacturer that produced automobiles from 1909 to 1912. The name E-M-F was gleaned from the initials of the three company founders: Barney Everitt, William Metzger, and Walter Flanders.

Brass Era car

The Brass Era is an American term for the early period of automotive manufacturing, named for the prominent brass fittings used during this time for such things as lights and radiators. It is generally considered to encompass 1896 through 1915, a time when these vehicles were often referred to as horseless carriages.

Studebaker Avanti

The Studebaker Avanti is a personal luxury coupe manufactured and marketed by Studebaker Corporation between June 1962 and December 1963. A halo car for the maker, it was marketed as "America's only four-passenger high-performance personal car."

Studebaker Commander

The Studebaker Commander is the model name of several automobiles produced by the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana and Studebaker of Canada Ltd of Walkerville and, later, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Studebaker began using the Commander name in 1927 and continued to use it until 1964, with the exception of 1936 and 1959-63. The name was applied to various products in the company's line-up from year to year.

Studebaker Lark

The Studebaker Lark is a compact car that was produced by Studebaker from 1959 to 1966.

Studebaker Canada

Studebaker of Canada Ltd. was the name given to Studebaker Corporation's Canadian manufacturing arm.

The Studebaker-Packard Corporation was the entity created in 1954 by the purchase of the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana, by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan. While Studebaker was the larger of the two companies, Packard's balance sheet and executive team were stronger than that of the South Bend company.

Packard Clipper

The Packard Clipper is an automobile which was built by the Packard Motor Car Company for models years 1941–1942, 1946–1947 and 1953–1957. For 1956 only, Clipper was classified as a stand-alone marque. The Clipper was introduced in April, 1941, as a mid-model year entry. It was available only as a four-door sedan. The Clipper name was reintroduced in 1953, for the automaker's lowest-priced lineup. By 1955, the Clipper models were seen as diluting Packard's marketing as a luxury automobile marque. It was named for a type of sailing ship, called a clipper.

Packard Executive

The Packard Executive was an automobile produced by the Packard-Clipper Division of the Studebaker-Packard Corporation in 1956.

Studebaker Electric

The Studebaker Electric was an automobile produced by the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company of South Bend, Indiana, a forerunner of the Studebaker Corporation. The battery-powered cars were sold from 1902 to 1912.

Studebaker-Garford

Studebaker-Garford was an automobile produced and distributed jointly by the Garford Company of Elyria, Ohio, and the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana, from 1904 through 1911. During its production, the car was sold as a Studebaker, per the marketing agreement between the two firms, but Studebaker collectors break the vehicles out under the Studebaker-Garford name because of the extent of Garford components.

The De Luxe was an American automobile manufactured in 1907 by the De Luxe Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan Country Life in America, February 1907, p. 456)]. The De Luxe was a high-priced vehicle for its day, retailing for around $5000. De Luxe took over the factory belonging to the Kirk Manufacturing Company, maker of the Yale automobile in Toledo, Ohio, in 1906. Soon after De Luxe moved to a brand new facility on a 15-acre (61,000 m2) site on Clark Street at Jefferson Avenue in Detroit. After producing fewer than 100 cars in 1908, the company was acquired by the E-M-F Company in 1909. The factory was used by E-M-F to build the Flanders 20. E-M-F was acquired by Studebaker in 1910, who continued to produce automobiles in Detroit until its operations were moved to South Bend, Indiana, in the 1920s.

Clement Studebaker

Clement Studebaker was an American wagon and carriage manufacturer. With his brother Henry, he co-founded the H & C Studebaker Company, precursor of the Studebaker Corporation, which built Pennsylvania-German Conestoga wagons and carriages during his lifetime, and automobiles after his death, in South Bend, Indiana.

John Studebaker

John Mohler Studebaker was the Pennsylvania Dutch co-founder and later executive of what would become the Studebaker Corporation automobile company. He was the third son of the founding Studebaker family, and played a key role in the growth of the company during his years as president, from 1868 until his death in 1917.

The South Bend Watch Company, a manufacturing company of pocket watches, was based in South Bend, Indiana.

Avanti (car) American performance sports car

The Avanti is an American performance sports coupe based on the Studebaker Avanti and marketed through a succession of five different ownership arrangements between 1965 and 2006.

References

  1. 1 2 3 John L. Tincher III Danville's Tincher Automobile Reprinted from Winter 1981-82, page 10
  2. Phillips, Lou. Cars 1895-1965 Xlibris 2011, p. 638[ self-published source ]
  3. Burness, Tad (October 28, 2011). "1904 Tincher". The Monterey County Herald. MediaNews Group. Retrieved December 28, 2013.