Studebaker Sky Hawk

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Studebaker Sky Hawk
Overview
Manufacturer Studebaker
Model years 1956
Assembly South Bend, Indiana, United States
Designer Raymond Loewy
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door hardtop
Layout Front-engine, rear-wheel-drive
Related
Powertrain
Engine 289 cu in (4.7 L) V8
Transmission
Dimensions
Wheelbase 120.5 in (3,061 mm)
Curb weight 3,215 lb (1,458 kg) [2]

The Studebaker Sky Hawk was a pillarless two-door hardtop coupe produced by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation for the 1956 model year only. The Sky Hawk was considered part of the Studebaker President series. One of four models of Hawks available that year, the Sky Hawk was positioned between the flagship Golden Hawk and Power Hawk pillared coupe. Sky Hawks differed from Golden Hawks in that they had less chrome trim and lacked the Golden Hawk's fins. They also had slightly less luxurious interiors, and were powered by the President's 289 cubic inch (4.7 L) V-8 with 210 horsepower (157 kW) standard and 225 horsepower (168 kW) optional (rather than the Packard 352 of the Golden Hawk). The Sky Hawk's base price was $2,477 before options, and 3,050 were produced that year. The Sky Hawk was discontinued for the 1957 model year.

The Studebaker-Packard Corporation was the entity created in 1954 by the purchase of the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana, by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan. While Studebaker was the larger of the two companies, Packard's balance sheet and executive team were stronger than that of the South Bend company.

Studebaker President car model

The Studebaker President was the premier automobile model manufactured by the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana (US) from 1926-1942. The nameplate was reintroduced in 1955 and used until the end of the 1958 model when the name was retired.

The Studebaker-Packard Hawk series were cars produced by the merged Studebaker-Packard corporation between 1956 and 1964. All but the 1958 Packard Hawk were badged Studebaker. Described by the company as "family sports cars", they were all two-door, four-seat coupes and hardtops. They were an evolution of the beautiful long wheelbase (120") 1953 C/K models designed by Robert Bourke, lead designer with the Raymond Loewy Agency. The 1962 redesign as the GT Hawk was by another famed stylist, Brooks Stevens.

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References

  1. "1956 Studebaker Sky Hawk Technical Specifications and data". Conceptcarz. Retrieved August 8, 2016.
  2. The Auto Editors of Consumer Guide (July 25, 2007). "1956 Studebaker Sky Hawk". HowStuffWorks . Retrieved August 8, 2016.