The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan

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The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan

The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan.jpg

Cover of the paperback edition
Author Multiple authors
Country United States
Language English
Subject Music Of Bob Dylan
Genre Non-fiction, Criticism
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication date
February 19, 2009 (1st edition)
Media type Print (Hardcover and Paperback)
Pages 204 pp
ISBN 0-521-71494-X (1st edition, paperback)

The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan is a book published in 2009 by Cambridge University Press intended to analyze the work of American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. It is the fourth book of Cambridge Companion to American Studies. This book is edited by Kevin J. Dettmar and contains seventeen essays, each written by a different person.

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world. It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.

Singer-songwriter musician who writes, composes and sings

Singer-songwriters are musicians who write, compose, and perform their own musical material, including lyrics and melodies.

Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist

Bob Dylan is an American singer-songwriter, author, and visual artist who has been a major figure in popular culture for six decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when songs such as "Blowin' in the Wind" (1963) and "The Times They Are a-Changin'" (1964) became anthems for the Civil Rights Movement and anti-war movement. His lyrics incorporated a wide range of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences, defied existing conventions of popular music, and appealed to the burgeoning counterculture, such as on the six-minute single "Like a Rolling Stone" (1965).

The whole book is divided in two sections. The first one ("Perspectives"), containing nine essays, attempts to describe different sides of Dylan's work. The next section ("Landmark Albums") describes eight landmark Dylan albums.

Reception

Kieran Curran of PopMatters gave the book 5 stars out of 10, and stated: "it's an interesting read for the academically inclined budding Dylanologist [...], even if it is lacking in a pop musicology sense. For the unconverted to Dylan though, there would be no point in picking this up – every essay is built upon the assumption that Dylan is worthy of extended proselytising." [1]

PopMatters is an international online magazine of cultural criticism that covers many aspects of popular culture. PopMatters publishes reviews, interviews, and detailed essays on most cultural products and expressions in areas such as music, television, films, books, video games, comics, sports, theater, visual arts, travel, and the Internet.

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References

  1. Curran, Kieran (31 August 2009). "The Cambridge Companion to Bob Dylan by Kevin Dettmar (editor)". PopMatters . Retrieved 7 August 2017.