Never Ending Tour 1988

Last updated
Never Ending Tour 1988
Tour by Bob Dylan
Start dateJune 7, 1988
End dateOctober 19, 1988
Legs3
No. of shows71
Bob Dylan concert chronology

The Never Ending Tour is the popular name for Bob Dylan's endless touring schedule since June 7, 1988. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

Background

On the first year of the tour he performed 71 concerts. This is the 2nd fewest performances on a 'Never Ending Tour' yearly tour.The 1988 tour stayed within North America, performing 63 concerts in the United States and 8 in Canada. He performed in 29 states in the US and 6 provinces in Canada. [4] [5]

Set list

This set list is representative of the performance on October 16, 1988 in New York City. It does not represent the set list at all concerts for the duration of the tour. [6]

  1. "Subterranean Homesick Blues"
  2. "I'll Remember You"
  3. "John Brown"
  4. "Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again
  5. "Simple Twist of Fate"
  6. "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream"
  7. "Highway 61 Revisited"
  8. "Gates of Eden"
  9. "With God on Our Side"
  10. "One Too Many Mornings"
  11. "Silvio"
  12. "In the Garden"
  13. "Like a Rolling Stone"
Encore
  1. "The Wagoner's Lad"
  2. "The Times They Are a-Changin'"
  3. "All Along the Watchtower"

Tour dates

DateCityCountryVenueAttendanceBox Office
Interstate 88
June 7, 1988 Concord United States Concord Pavilion
June 9, 1988 Sacramento Cal Expo Amphitheatre
June 10, 1988 Berkeley Hearst Greek Theatre
June 11, 1988 Mountain View Shoreline Amphitheatre
June 13, 1988 Salt Lake City Park West
June 15, 1988 Greenwood Village Fiddler's Green Amphitheatre
June 17, 1988 St. Louis The Muny
June 18, 1988 East Troy Alpine Valley Music Theatre 12,471 / 20,000$221,203 [7]
June 21, 1988 Cuyahoga Falls Blossom Music Center
June 22, 1988 Cincinnati Riverbend Music Center
June 24, 1988 Holmdel Garden State Arts Center 15,166 / 18,000$275,210 [8]
June 25, 1988
June 26, 1988 Saratoga Springs Saratoga Performing Arts Center
June 28, 1988 Hopewell Finger Lakes Performing Arts Center
June 30, 1988 Wantagh Jones Beach Marine Theater 18,000 / 20,000$360,000 [8]
July 1, 1988
July 2, 1988 Mansfield Great Woods Performing Arts Center
July 3, 1988 Old Orchard Beach The Ballpark
July 6, 1988 Philadelphia Mann Music Center 9,396 / 13,200$147,787 [9]
July 8, 1988 Montreal Canada Montreal Forum
July 9, 1988 Ottawa Ottawa Civic Centre
July 11, 1988 Hamilton Copps Coliseum 8,639 / 11,210$151,310 [10]
July 13, 1988 Charlevoix United States Castle Farms Music Theatre
July 14, 1988 Hoffman Estates Poplar Creek Music Theater
July 15, 1988 [lower-alpha 1] Indianapolis Indiana State Fairground Grandstand
July 17, 1988 Rochester Meadow Brook Music Theatre
July 18, 1988
July 20, 1988 Columbia Merriweather Post Pavilion
July 22, 1988 Nashville Starwood Amphitheatre
July 24, 1988 Atlanta Chastain Park Amphitheatre 12,706 / 12,706$253,716 [11]
July 25, 1988
July 26, 1988 Memphis Mud Island Amphitheatre
July 28, 1988 Dallas Coca-Cola Starplex Amphitheatre
July 30, 1988 Mesa Mesa Amphitheatre
July 31, 1988 Costa Mesa Pacific Amphitheatre
August 2, 1988 Los Angeles Greek Theatre
August 3, 1988
August 4, 1988
August 6, 1988 Carlsbad Sammis Pavilion
August 7, 1988 Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Bowl
August 19, 1988 Portland Portland Civic Auditorium
August 20, 1988 George Champs de Brionne Music Theatre
August 21, 1988 Vancouver Canada Pacific Coliseum 8,320 / 10,000$173,752 [12]
August 23, 1988 Calgary Olympic Saddledome 12,893 / 12,893$270,551 [12]
August 24, 1988 Edmonton Northlands Coliseum 9,819 / 10,000$204,722 [12]
August 26, 1988 Winnipeg Winnipeg Arena
August 29, 1988 Toronto CNE Grandstand 9,551 / 12,000$192,519 [13]
August 31, 1988 [lower-alpha 2] Syracuse United States New York State Fairground Grandstand
September 2, 1988 [lower-alpha 3] Middletown Orange County Fairgrounds
September 3, 1988 Manchester Riverfront Park
September 4, 1988 Bristol Lake Compounce
September 7, 1988 Essex Junction The Champlain Valley Expo
September 8, 1988 Binghamton Broome County Veterans Memorial Arena
September 10, 1988 Stanhope Waterloo Village
September 11, 1988 Fairfax Patriot Center
September 13, 1988 Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Civic Arena
September 15, 1988 Chapel Hill Dean Smith Center
September 16, 1988 Columbia Carolina Coliseum
September 17, 1988 Charlotte Charlotte Coliseum
September 18, 1988 Knoxville Thompson–Boling Arena
September 19, 1988 Charlottesville University Hall
September 22, 1988 Tampa USF Sun Dome
September 23, 1988 Miami Miami Arena
September 24, 1988 Gainesville O'Connell Center
September 25, 1988 New Orleans Hibernia Pavilion
October 13, 1988 Upper Darby Tower Theater
October 14, 1988
October 16, 1988 New York City Radio City Music Hall 23,025 / 23,496$549,303 [14]
October 17, 1988
October 18, 1988
October 19, 1988

Personnel

Special guests
Neil Young
  • June 7, 1988: Guitar on ten songs
  • June 10, 1988: Guitar on six songs
  • June 11, 1988: Guitar on six songs
Joe Walsh
  • July 26, 1988: Guitar on two songs
Joe Walsh
  • July 26, 1988: Guitar on two songs
The Alarm
  • August 4, 1988: Mike Peters (shared vocals), Dave Sharp (guitar) and Eddie McDonald & Nigel Twist (backing vocals) on one song.
  • August 7, 1988: Mike Peters (shared vocals), Dave Sharp (guitar) and Eddie McDonald & Nigel Twist (backing vocals) on one song.
Tracy Chapman
  • August 21, 1988: Co-vocals on one song
  • August 23, 1988: Co-vocals on one song
  • August 24, 1988: Co-vocals on one song
Doug Sahm
  • August 24, 1988: Lead vocals on one song

Notes

  1. The July 15, 1988 concert in Indianapolis, Indiana was part of the Indiana State Fair.
  2. The August 31, 1988 concert in Syracuse, New York was part of the Great New York State Fair.
  3. The September 2, 1988 concert in Middletown, New York was part of the Orange County Fair.

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References

  1. Hann, Michael. "Bob Dylan begins his 'never-ending' tour". The Guardian. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  2. Wyman, Bill. "10 Things You Didn't Know About Bob Dylan's Never Ending Tour". Vulture. Vulture. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  3. "Bob Dylan's Never-Ending Tour turns 30 this year". RTE.ie. RTE. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  4. Taylor, John. "Bob Dylan's Never Ending Tour is still rolling, but things have changed". The Washington Post. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  5. Jaffe, Eric. "808 Cities, 2,503 Shows, and 1,007,416 Miles: The Staggering Geography of Bob Dylan's 'Never Ending Tour'". citylab.com. City Lab. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  6. "October 16, 1988 New York, NY Radio City Music Hall". bobdylan.com. Bob Dylan. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  7. Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 28 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. July 9, 1988. p. 22. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  8. 1 2 Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 29 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. July 16, 1988. p. 28. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  9. Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 30 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. July 23, 1988. p. 22. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  10. Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 31 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. July 30, 1988. p. 31. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  11. Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 33 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. August 13, 1988. p. 24. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  12. 1 2 3 Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 37 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. September 10, 1988. p. 30. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  13. Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 38 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard. September 17, 1988. p. 38. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  14. Billboard Boxscore (PDF) (100, 46 ed.). Amusement Business/Billboard Boxscore. November 12, 1988. p. 27. Retrieved 18 April 2020.