The River (1929 film)

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The River
The River FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed by Frank Borzage
Produced by William Fox
Written by John Hunter Booth
Tristram Tupper (novel)
Dwight Cummins
Philip Klein
Starring Charles Farrell
Mary Duncan
Music by Maurice Baron
Cinematography Ernest Palmer
Edited by Barney Wolf
Distributed by Fox Film Corporation
Release date
October 6, 1929 (1929-10-06)
Running time
84 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The River is a 1929 partial-talkie drama film directed by Frank Borzage, and starring Charles Farrell and Mary Duncan. Much of the film has been lost. [1] A reconstructed Version with the about 45 minutes of surviving film, using still images and explanatory titlecards to bridge the missing scenes, was produced by the Munich Filmmuseum, in collaboration with the cinémathèques of Switzerland and Luxembourg. [2] This version was screened in 2006 by the American Museum of the Moving Image in New York City. Borzage also directed Farrell, opposite Janet Gaynor, in Seventh Heaven (1927), Street Angel (1928), and Lucky Star (1929) during this period.

Contents

Plot summary

Allen John Spender (Charles Farrell) is a virile outdoorsman and Rosalee (Mary Duncan) is his high society sweetheart. [3]

Cast

Reception

Revue du Cinema critic Jean George Auriol described The River as "undoubtedly the most lyrical love film ever made." [4]

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References

  1. Richardson, M. (2006) Surrealism and cinema, Berg Publishers, p66
  2. "Global Discoveries on DVD: Summer Inventory (with some updates)" by Jonathan Rosenbaum, Cinema Scope. Accessed December 13, 2010
  3. The River (1929) - Frank Borzage | Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related | AllMovie , retrieved March 17, 2021
  4. Hervé Dumont (2006) Frank Borzage: the life and films of a Hollywood romantic, McFarland