Magnificent Doll

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Magnificent Doll
Directed by Frank Borzage
Produced by Jack H. Skirball
Screenplay by Irving Stone
Story by Irving Stone
Starring Ginger Rogers
David Niven
Music by Hans J. Salter
Cinematography Joseph A. Valentine
Edited by Ted J. Kent
Production
company
Hallmark Productions
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date
  • November 1946 (1946-11)
Running time
95 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Magnificent Doll is a 1946 American drama film directed by Frank Borzage and starring Ginger Rogers as Dolly Madison and David Niven as Aaron Burr. The supporting cast features Burgess Meredith as James Madison and Grandon Rhodes as Thomas Jefferson. The screenplay was written by Irving Stone (author of Lust for Life and The Agony and the Ecstasy ).

Contents

Summary

A young woman is wooed by Aaron Burr and James Madison. [1]

Cast

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References

  1. "Magnificent Doll (1946)". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved December 18, 2015.