Three Comrades (1938 film)

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Three Comrades
Three-Comrades-1938.jpg
Original film poster
Directed by Frank Borzage
Produced by Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Screenplay by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Edward E. Paramore Jr.
Based onnovel Three Comrades by Erich Maria Remarque
Starring Robert Taylor
Margaret Sullavan
Franchot Tone
Robert Young
Music by Franz Waxman
Cinematography Joseph Ruttenberg
Edited by Frank Sullivan
Production
company
Distributed by MGM
Release date
Running time
100 min
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$839,000 [1]
Box office$2,043,000 [1] [2]

Three Comrades is a 1938 drama film directed by Frank Borzage and produced by Joseph L. Mankiewicz for MGM. The screenplay is by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Edward E. Paramore Jr., and was adapted from the novel Three Comrades by Erich Maria Remarque. It tells the story of the friendship of three young German soldiers following World War I, during the Weimar Republic and the rise of Nazism.

Contents

The film stars Robert Taylor, Margaret Sullavan, Franchot Tone and Robert Young. Sullavan was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Cast

Reception

Frank Nugent, critic for The New York Times , called Three Comrades "a beautiful and memorable film. Faithful to the spirit and, largely, to the letter of the novel, it has been magnificently directed, eloquently written, and admirably played." He praised nearly all of the main actors, particularly Sullavan ("Hers is a shimmering, almost unendurably lovely performance."), but was less impressed with Taylor ("who is good occasionally but more often is merely acceptable"). [3]

According to MGM records, the film earned $1,193,000 in the United States and Canada and $850,000 elsewhere, resulting in a profit of $472,000. [2]

The film was nominated for the American Film Institute's 2002 list AFI's 100 Years...100 Passions. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study.
  2. 1 2 Scott Eyman, Lion of Hollywood: The Life and Legend of Louis B. Mayer, Robson, 2005 p 277
  3. Frank Nugent (June 3, 1938). "Three Comrades". The New York Times.
  4. "AFI's 100 Years...100 Passions Nominees" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-08-20.