Thornbury (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
Thornbury
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
County Gloucestershire
Major settlements Thornbury
18851950
Number of membersOne
Replaced by Stroud & Thornbury
Created from West Gloucestershire

Thornbury was a county constituency centred on the town of Thornbury in Gloucestershire. It returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post voting system.

Gloucestershire County of England

Gloucestershire is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom Lower house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons, officially the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Owing to shortage of space, its office accommodation extends into Portcullis House.

Parliament of the United Kingdom Supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom

The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known internationally as the UK Parliament, British Parliament, or Westminster Parliament, and domestically simply as Parliament, is the supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom, the Crown dependencies and the British Overseas Territories. It alone possesses legislative supremacy and thereby ultimate power over all other political bodies in the UK and the overseas territories. Parliament is bicameral but has three parts, consisting of the Sovereign, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. The two houses meet in the Palace of Westminster in the City of Westminster, one of the inner boroughs of the capital city, London.

Contents

History

The constituency was created by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 for the 1885 general election, and abolished for the 1950 general election.

Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 United Kingdom legislation

The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was a piece of electoral reform legislation that redistributed the seats in the House of Commons, introducing the concept of equally populated constituencies, a concept in the broader global context termed equal apportionment, in an attempt to equalise representation across the UK. It was associated with, but not part of, the Representation of the People Act 1884.

1885 United Kingdom general election nationwide election to the House of Commons

The 1885 United Kingdom general election was held from 24 November to 18 December 1885. This was the first general election after an extension of the franchise and redistribution of seats. For the first time a majority of adult males could vote and most constituencies by law returned a single member to Parliament fulfilling one of the ideals of Chartism to provide direct single-member, single-electorate accountability. It saw the Liberals, led by William Ewart Gladstone, win the most seats, but not an overall majority. As the Irish Nationalists held the balance of power between them and the Conservatives who sat with an increasing number of allied Unionist MPs, this exacerbated divisions within the Liberals over Irish Home Rule and led to a Liberal split and another general election the following year.

1950 United Kingdom general election

The 1950 United Kingdom general election was the first general election ever to be held after a full term of Labour government. The election was held on Thursday 23 February 1950. Despite polling over 700,000 votes more than the Conservatives, and receiving more votes than they had during the 1945 general election, Labour obtained a slim majority of just five seats—a stark contrast to 1945, when they had achieved a comfortable 146-seat majority. There was a national swing towards the Conservatives, who gained 90 seats. Labour called another general election in 1951.

Boundaries

1885-1918: The Sessional Divisions of Chipping Sodbury, Thornbury, and Lawford's Gate except the part included in the parliamentary borough of Bristol.

1918-1950: The Urban District of Kingswood, and the Rural Districts of Sodbury, Thornbury, and Warmley.

Members of Parliament

ElectionMember [1] Party
1885 Stafford Howard Liberal
1886 John Plunkett Conservative
1892 Charles Colston Conservative
1906 Athelstan Rendall Liberal
1922 Herbert Charles Woodcock Conservative
1923 Athelstan Rendall Liberal
1924 Sir Derrick Gunston, Bt. Unionist
1945 Joseph Alpass Labour
1950 constituency abolished

Elections

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1885: Thornbury [2] [3] [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Stafford Howard 4,83450.8N/A
Conservative Benjamin St John Ackers 4,68949.2N/A
Majority1451.6N/A
Turnout 9,52384.0N/A
Registered electors 11,333
Liberal win (new seat)
General election 1886: Thornbury [2] [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Plunkett 4,93554.9+5.7
Liberal Stafford Howard 4,05445.1-5.7
Majority8819.8N/A
Turnout 8,98979.3-4.7
Registered electors 11,333
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing -5.7

Elections in the 1890s

Colston Charles Colston.jpg
Colston
General election 1892: Thornbury [2] [3] [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Colston 5,20251.1-3.8
Liberal Stafford Howard 4,97848.9+3.8
Majority2242.2-7.6
Turnout 10,18085.8+6.5
Registered electors 11,867
Conservative hold Swing -3.8
Allen Arthur Acland Allen.jpg
Allen
General election 1895: Thornbury [2] [3] [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Colston 5,72755.3+4.2
Liberal Arthur Acland Allen 4,63844.7-4.2
Majority1,08910.8+8.4
Turnout 10,63585.0-0.8
Registered electors 12,195
Conservative hold Swing +4.2

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1900: Thornbury [2] [3] [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Colston Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1906: Thornbury [2] [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Athelstan Rendall 7,37058.4N/A
Conservative Charles Colston 5,24041.6N/A
Majority2,13016.8N/A
Turnout 12,61089.5N/A
Registered electors 14,096
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Thornbury [2] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Athelstan Rendall 7,27053.8-4.6
Conservative Cyril Augustus Ward 6,25146.2+4.6
Majority1,0197.6-9.2
Turnout 13,52191.7+2.2
Liberal hold Swing -4.6
George Cockerill George K. Cockerill.jpg
George Cockerill
General election December 1910: Thornbury [2] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Athelstan Rendall 6,82053.9+0.1
Conservative George Cockerill 5,83746.1-0.1
Majority9837.8+0.2
Turnout 12,65785.9+5.8
Liberal hold Swing +0.1

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

Athelstan Rendall British politician

Athelstan Rendall was a Liberal Party, later Labour politician in the United Kingdom.

George Cockerill (British Army officer) British politician

Brigadier-General Sir George Kynaston Cockerill, was a British Army officer and a Conservative Party politician.

Athelstan Rendall 1918 Athelstan Rendall.jpg
Athelstan Rendall
General election 1918: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
C Liberal Athelstan Rendall 9,99962.0+8.1
National Thomas Pilcher 6,13238.0N/A
Majority3,68724.0+16.2
Turnout 16,13147.638.3
Registered electors 33,862
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1922: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Herbert Charles Woodcock 10,68239.5n/a
Liberal Athelstan Rendall 10,57839.2-22.8
Labour Joseph Alpass 5,74921.3n/a
Majority1040.4-23.6
Turnout 27,00977.9+30.3
Registered electors 34,655
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing n/a
General election 1923: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Athelstan Rendall 16,72262.0+22.8
Unionist Herbert Charles Woodcock 10,25238.0-1.5
Majority6,47024.0+2.7
Turnout 26,97475.6-2.4
Registered electors 35,695
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing +12.2
General election 1924: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Derrick Gunston 12,50042.9+4.9
Liberal Athelstan Rendall 10,28335.3-26.7
Labour Godfrey Elton 6,37621.9-
Majority2,2177.6-16.4
Turnout 29,15979.5+3.9
Registered electors 36,672
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +15.8
General election 1929: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Derrick Gunston 13,91434.0-8.9
Liberal John Adam Day 13,61433.2-2.0
Labour Godfrey Elton 13,44532.8+10.9
Majority3000.7-6.9
Turnout 40,97382.5+3.0
Registered electors 49,645
Unionist hold Swing -3.4

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1931: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Derrick Gunston 23,07255.1+21.1
Labour George Pearce Blizard 11,00826.3-6.5
Liberal J. Howard Whitehouse 7,82618.7-14.6
Majority12,06428.8+28.1
Turnout 41,90679.7-2.8
Registered electors 52,547
Conservative hold Swing +13.8
General election 1935: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Derrick Gunston 19,18047.4-7.6
Labour F. A. Heron15,16437.5+11.2
Liberal Wilfred J. Jenkins6,10415.1-3.6
Majority4,0169.9-18.9
Turnout 40,44871.5-8.3
Registered electors 56,582
Conservative hold Swing -9.4

General Election 1939/40: Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the Autumn of 1939, the following candidates had been selected;

Joseph Herbert Alpass was a British Labour Party politician.

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Thornbury [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Joseph Alpass 28,36449.3+11.8
Conservative Derrick Gunston 18,92732.9-14.5
Liberal Ronald W Brighton10,26217.8+2.7
Majority9,43716.4+6.5
Turnout 57,55376.4+5.0
Registered electors 75,286
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +13.2

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References

  1. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "T" (part 1)
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. p. 287. ISBN   9781349022984.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  4. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1886
  5. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1896
  6. 1 2 Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  7. 1 2 Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  8. Standard 21 June 1913
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  10. Report of the Annual Conference of the Labour Party, 1939
  11. Gloucestershire Echo, 9 May 1938