Three Oaks railway station

Last updated

Three Oaks
National Rail logo.svg
Three Oaks railway station.jpg
The platform at Three Oaks station, looking north
Location Three Oaks, Rother
England
Coordinates 50°54′01″N0°36′49″E / 50.90028°N 0.61361°E / 50.90028; 0.61361 Coordinates: 50°54′01″N0°36′49″E / 50.90028°N 0.61361°E / 50.90028; 0.61361
Grid reference TQ838144
Managed by Southern
Platforms1
Other information
Station codeTOK
Classification DfT category F2
History
Opened1 July 1907
Original company South Eastern Railway
Pre-grouping South Eastern and Chatham Railway
Post-grouping Southern Railway
Key dates
1 July 1907 (1907-07-01)Opened as Three Oaks Bridge Halt
1909Renamed Three Oaks Halt
?Renamed Three Oaks and Guestling Halt
5 May 1969Renamed Three Oaks and Guestling
12 May 1980Renamed Three Oaks
Passengers
2014/15Increase2.svg 8,462
2015/16Increase2.svg 9,604
2016/17Decrease2.svg 6,648
2017/18Increase2.svg 8,096
2018/19Increase2.svg 11,534
Notes
Passenger statistics from the Office of Rail and Road

Three Oaks railway station serves the village of Three Oaks in East Sussex, England. It is on the Marshlink Line, and train services are provided by Southern. It was originally known as Three Oaks & Guestling.

Contents

History

The railway line between Ashford and Hastings was opened by the South Eastern Railway in 1851, [1] but originally there were no stations between Winchelsea and Hastings. [2] [3] Ore opened in 1888, [4] and with the introduction of steam railmotor services between Rye and Hastings, [5] [6] three halts were opened between Winchelsea and Ore on 1 July 1907: Snailham Crossing Halt; [7] Guestling Halt; [8] and Three Oaks Bridge Halt. [9] The latter station has been renamed four times: in 1909 it became Three Oaks Halt; later on it became Three Oaks and Guestling Halt; on 5 May 1969 Three Oaks and Guestling; finally on 12 May 1980 the present name of Three Oaks was adopted. [9]

Description

The station has a single platform from which trains depart to Ashford International and Eastbourne via Hastings. The line was singled in 1979, with all trains using the one-time westbound platform, the eastbound platform remaining in situ, albeit in a decaying state.

The platform can only accommodate a single carriage, meaning that passengers wishing to disembark must travel in the front carriage of the train.

There is a ticket issuing facility accepting card payments available here and a customer help point with on screen customer information.

Centrally located in Three Oaks village, the service from this station was limited to only three or four trains a day in each direction, at inconvenient times, for a number of years. This has been increased to a two hourly service in each direction to Ashford and Brighton from December 2010. This followed an active campaign by Three Oaks and Winchelsea Action for Rail Transport (THWART) and the Marshlink Line Action Group (MLAG), and it is hoped that this development will drive-up usage, which has historically been very low. Until May 2018, southbound services ran as express services to Brighton , but this was discontinued and changed to a Eastbourne stopping service, due to long journey times and lack of rolling stock, which caused overcrowding, especially between Brighton and Eastbourne. [10]

Related Research Articles

Brighton railway station Railway station in Brighton, East Sussex, England

Brighton railway station is the southern terminus of the Brighton main line in England, and the principal station serving the city of Brighton, East Sussex. It is 50 miles 49 chains (81.45 km) from London Bridge via Redhill.

Marshlink line

The Marshlink line is a railway line in South East England. It runs from Ashford, Kent via Romney Marsh, Rye and the Ore Tunnel to Hastings where it connects to the East Coastway line towards Eastbourne. Services are provided by Southern.

Hastings railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Hastings railway station is the southern terminus of the Hastings line in the south of England and is one of four stations that serve the town of Hastings, East Sussex. It is also on the East Coastway Line to Eastbourne and the Marshlink line to Ashford International. It is 62 miles 33 chains (100.4 km) from London Charing Cross measured via Chelsfield and Battle; and 82 miles 33 chains (132.6 km) from Charing Cross via Chelsfield and Ashford.

East Coastway line Railway line

The East Coastway line is a railway line along the south coast of Sussex to the east of Brighton, England. Trains to the West of Brighton operate on the West Coastway line. Together with the West Coastway and the Marshlink line to the east, the line forms part of a continuous route from Havant to Ashford. The Brighton Main Line route to Eastbourne and Hastings, via Plumpton and Cooksbridge, shares the East Coastway line east of Lewes station.

Ashford International railway station

Ashford International railway station is a National Rail international and regional station in Ashford, Kent. It connects several railway lines, including High Speed 1 and the South Eastern main line. Domestic trains that call at Ashford are operated by Southeastern and Southern, and international services by Eurostar.

Cooden Beach railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Cooden Beach serves Cooden at the western end of Bexhill in East Sussex. It is on the East Coastway Line, and train services are provided by Southern.

Normans Bay railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Normans Bay railway station serves Normans Bay in East Sussex. It is on the East Coastway Line, and train services are provided by Southern.

Pevensey Bay railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Pevensey Bay railway station serves Pevensey Bay in East Sussex, England. It is on the East Coastway Line, and train services are provided by Southern.

Ore railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Ore railway station serves Ore in East Sussex, England. It is on the Marshlink Line, and train services are provided by Southern, with a few peak services operated by Southeastern.

Doleham railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Doleham railway station is a small, single-platform wayside halt in East Sussex, England. It is on the Marshlink line, and train services are provided by Southern. The station is very isolated and serves only a handful of houses in the immediate area.

Winchelsea railway station Railway station in East Sussex, England

Winchelsea railway station is a railway station in East Sussex, England. It is about 0.62 miles (1 km) from Winchelsea and is actually in the neighbouring parish of Udimore. It is on the Marshlink line 9.3 miles (15 km) north east of Hastings, and train services are provided by Southern. The station originally had two platforms, but in 1979, the line was singled and only the up platform is now in use. The former down platform and station building are now converted to a private house.

Rye railway station (East Sussex)

Rye railway station is a Grade II listed station, serving Rye, East Sussex, England. It is on the Marshlink line between Hastings and Ashford International and is the principal station between those two terminals. The station is a passing place between two single track sections. Services are provided by Southern, usually between Eastbourne and Ashford with an additional shuttle from Rye to Ashford at peak times.

Appledore railway station

Appledore railway station is a Grade II listed station east of Appledore in Kent, England. It is on the Marshlink line, and train services are provided by Southern.

Ham Street railway station

Ham Street railway station is a Grade II listed stop on the Marshlink line in the village of Hamstreet, Kent, between Ashford International and Hastings. Services are provided by Southern.

Lewes railway station

Lewes railway station serves the town of Lewes in East Sussex, England. It has five platforms and is on the East Coastway Line, 49 miles 74 chains (80.3 km) from London Bridge via Redhill. Train services are provided by Southern.

Cooksbridge railway station

Cooksbridge railway station serves the village of Cooksbridge in East Sussex. It is on the East Coastway Line, 47 miles 31 chains (76.3 km) from London Bridge via Redhill. Train services are provided by Southern.

St Leonards West Marina railway station Disused railway station in East Sussex, England

St Leonards West Marina is a disused railway station in the West St Leonards area of the borough of Hastings, East Sussex. Opened by the Brighton, Lewes and Hastings Railway in 1846 as part of what became the East Coastway Line, it was the first permanent station to serve the area and became part of a feud between two rival railway companies over access to nearby Hastings. Although ultimately inconvenient for local services, the station became an important goods railhead and the location of a motive power depot for locomotives working express services to London. The station was closed in 1967 and subsequently demolished, although in 2011 remnants of the down platform could still be seen.

Brookland Halt railway station

Brookland Halt was a railway station which served the village of Brookland in Kent, England. The station opened in 1881 and closed in 1967.

Snailham Halt railway station Disused railway station in East Sussex, England

Snailham Halt railway station was on the South Eastern Railway's route between Ashford and Hastings, nowadays known as the Marshlink Line. It opened in 1907 and closed in 1959.

Grimsby Pier railway station

Grimsby Pier railway station was sited on the now demolished pier with the same name in Grimsby, England.

References

  1. White, H.P. (1992) [1961]. Thomas, David St John; Patmore, J. Allan (eds.). Volume 2: Southern England. A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain (5th ed.). Nairn: David St John Thomas. p. 34. ISBN   0-946537-77-1.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. Knight, Andrew (1986). The Railways of South East England. Shepperton: Ian Allan. p. 57. ISBN   0-7110-1556-2.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  3. McCarthy, Colin; McCarthy, David; Cobb, Michael (October 2007). Waller, Peter (ed.). Railways of Britain: Kent and Sussex. Hersham: Ian Allan. map 34. ISBN   978-0-7110-3222-4. 0710/C1.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  4. Butt, R.V.J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations. Yeovil: Patrick Stephens Ltd. p. 178. ISBN   1-85260-508-1. R508.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  5. Bradley, D.L. (April 1980) [1961]. The Locomotive History of the South Eastern & Chatham Railway (2nd ed.). London: RCTS. p. 30. ISBN   0-901115-49-5.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  6. Gould, David (1993). Bogie Carriages of the South Eastern & Chatham Railway. Headington: Oakwood Press. p. 191. ISBN   0-85361-455-5. X52.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  7. Butt 1995 , p. 214
  8. Butt 1995 , p. 110
  9. 1 2 Butt 1995 , p. 229
  10. "Plans to axe unpopular two-carriage Eastbourne train service". Eastbourne Herald.
Preceding station National Rail logo.svg National Rail Following station
Ore
or
Hastings
  Southern
Marshlink Line
  Doleham
or
Rye