Throw bag

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A throw bag Rettungswurfleine.jpg
A throw bag

A throw bag or throw line is a rescue device with a length of rope stuffed loosely into a bag so it can pay out through the top when the bag is thrown to a swimmer.

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A throw bag is standard rescue equipment for kayaking and other outdoor river recreational activities.

A throw bag is used to rescue someone who is swimming down a river after capsizing their kayak or canoe, but can also be used for gear retrieval and for climbing during portages.

Swimmer rescue [1]

Usage of a throw bag in a Swift water rescue exercise Angel Thunder 2013 130410-F-PD696-1233.jpg
Usage of a throw bag in a Swift water rescue exercise

Gear Rescue – V Drag

Applications of the throw bag to rescue gear in a river. Have parties on both sides of a river that is smaller than the length of the line. Throw a bag from one side of the river to the other with both parties holding an end. Attach a person who has a lifejacket with a strong swimmer harness and attach them to the line. Using angles position them the gear and lower them down for rescue with either a pin kit or basic retrieval.

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