Money bag

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Saint Homobonus' (died 1197) attributes include a bag of money Omobono lianori.jpg
Saint Homobonus' (died 1197) attributes include a bag of money

A money bag (moneybag, bag of money, money sack, sack of money, bag of gold, gold bag, sack of gold, etc.) is a bag (normally with a drawstring) of money (or gold) used to hold and transport coins and banknotes from/to a mint, bank, ATM, vending machine, business, or other institution. [1] Money bags are usually transported in an armored car or a money train and, in the past, via stagecoach. It is a type of Currency packaging.

Drawstring string or cord used to draw up or gather a length of material, or close an opening

A drawstring is a string, cord, lace, or rope used to "draw" fabric or other material. The ends of the drawstring may be tied to hold it in place. Alternately, the drawstring may be kept drawn using a cordlock. Typically, the drawstring is loose when not being used, and tightened when needed during use.

Money Object or record accepted as payment

Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context. The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment. Any item or verifiable record that fulfils these functions can be considered as money.

Gold Chemical element with atomic number 79

Gold is a chemical element with the symbol Au and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium. Less commonly, it occurs in minerals as gold compounds, often with tellurium.

Contents

History

A conductor's bag with a money changer Schaffnertasche mit galoppwechsler.jpeg
A conductor's bag with a money changer
Money in a bag from the Nordic foreign exchange company Forex Bank Forex pase.jpg
Money in a bag from the Nordic foreign exchange company Forex Bank

According to the account given in the Bible's Gospel of John, Judas Iscariot carried the disciples' money bag. [2]

Judas Iscariot one of the original Twelve Disciples of Jesus Christ, known for betrayal of Jesus

Judas Iscariot(; Biblical Hebrew: יהודה‎, romanized: Yehûdâh, lit. 'God is praised'; Greek: Ὶούδας Ὶσκαριώτης) was a disciple and one of the original Twelve Disciples of Jesus Christ. According to all four canonical gospels, Judas betrayed Jesus to the Sanhedrin in the Garden of Gethsemane by kissing him and addressing him as "rabbi" to reveal his identity to the crowd who had come to arrest him. His name is often used synonymously with betrayal or treason. Judas's epithet Iscariot most likely means he came from the village of Kerioth, but this explanation is not universally accepted and many other possibilities have been suggested.

During the Roman era, the Legio IV Scythica was camped in Zeugma, an ancient city of Commagen (modern-day Turkey). Excavations carried out in the city revealed 65,000 seal imprints (in clay, known as “Bulla”) found in a place which is believed to serve as the archives for the customs of ancient Zeugma. The seal imprints used in sealing papyrus, parchment, moneybags, and customs bales are good indication of volume of the trade and the density of transportation and communication network once established in the region.

Zeugma, Commagene ancient city of Commagene in modern-day Turkey

Zeugma is an ancient city of Commagene; located in modern Gaziantep Province, Turkey. It was named for the bridge of boats, or zeugma, that crossed the Euphrates river at that location.

Bulla (seal) seal

A bulla is an inscribed clay or soft metal or bitumen or wax token used in commercial and legal documentation as a form of authentication and for tamper-proofing whatever is attached to it. In their oldest attested form, as used in the ancient Near and Middle East of the 8th millennium BCE onwards, bullae were hollow ball-like clay envelopes that contained other smaller tokens that identified the quantity and types of goods being recorded. In this form, bullae represent one of the earliest forms of specialization in the ancient world, and likely required skill to create. From about the 4th millennium BCE onwards, as communications on papyrus and parchment became widespread, bullae evolved into simpler tokens that were attached to the documents with cord, and impressed with a unique sign to provide the same kind of authoritative identification and for tamper-proofing. Bullae are still occasionally attached to documents for these purposes.

Customs authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting customs duties and for controlling the flow of goods

Customs” means the Government Service which is responsible for the administration of Customs law and the collection of duties and taxes and which also has the responsibility for the application of other laws and regulations relating to the importation, exportation, movement or storage of goods.

Charon's obol, a death custom originating in ancient Greece whereby a coin is placed with a corpse, in the 3rd-4th century AD in Western Europe, were often found in pouches, making them money pouches. From the Middle Ages to around 1900, Rottweiler dogs were used by travelling butchers at markets to guard money pouches tied around their necks. [3]

Rottweiler Dog breed

The Rottweiler is a breed of domestic dog, regarded as medium-to-large or large. The dogs were known in German as Rottweiler Metzgerhund, meaning Rottweil butchers' dogs, because their main use was to herd livestock and pull carts laden with butchered meat to market. This continued until the mid-19th century when railways replaced droving. Although still used to herd stock in many parts of the world, Rottweilers are now also used as search and rescue dogs, as guard dogs, and as police dogs.

Beginning in the 14th century, purses of money (panakizhi) were awarded to scholars during the Revathi Pattathanam, an annual assembly of scholars held in Kerala, India. In 16th century feudal Japan, samurai wore uchi-bukuro (money purses) around the waist or neck.

Revathi Pattathanam is an annual assembly of scholars held since ancient times at Kozhikode in Kerala, India. Traditionally a seven-day event, the festival used to be held under the patronage of the Zamorin of Kozhikode. The prime event of the assembly, is the conferring of the title Bhatta along with a panakizhi to selected scholars. The word Pattathanam is derived from Bhattadānam, which in Malayalam means "awarding of the Bhatta". The assembly used to begin on the day of the Revathi asterism, and hence the title Revathi Pattathanam.

Kerala State in southern India

Kerala is a state on the southwestern Malabar Coast of India. It was formed on 1 November 1956, following passage of the States Reorganisation Act, by combining Malayalam-speaking regions. Spread over 38,863 km2 (15,005 sq mi), Kerala is the twenty-second largest Indian state by area. It is bordered by Karnataka to the north and northeast, Tamil Nadu to the east and south, and the Lakshadweep Sea to the west. With 33,387,677 inhabitants as per the 2011 Census, Kerala is the thirteenth-largest Indian state by population. It is divided into 14 districts with the capital being Thiruvananthapuram. Malayalam is the most widely spoken language and is also the official language of the state.

Uchi-bukuro is a type of Japanese attire employed by the samurai class primarily around the Sengoku period of Japan. The Uchi-bukuro translated as a money purse that was usually carried at the waist or around the neck. These ways are known as being rather inconvenient, however. The best known way within feudal Japan to carry money is to paste old Japanese coins onto a folded strip of thick paper and put it between the collars of the under area of the armor.

In 1620, pediatric tracheotomy was unheard of until a boy tried to hide a bag of gold by swallowing it. It became lodged in his esophagus and blocked his trachea. The tracheotomy allowed the surgeon to manipulate the bag and it to pass through his system. [4] In September 1864, Rose O'Neal Greenhow, a Confederate agent, drowned with a bag of gold around her neck after leaving the Condor (a British blockade runner ship) in a boat.

Rose ONeal Greenhow American spy

Rose O'Neal Greenhow was a renowned Confederate spy during the American Civil War. A socialite in Washington, D.C. during the period before the war, she moved in important political circles and cultivated friendships with presidents, generals, senators, and high-ranking military officers including John C. Calhoun and James Buchanan. She used her connections to pass along key military information to the Confederacy at the start of the war. In early 1861, she was given control of a pro-Southern spy network in Washington, D.C. by her handler, Thomas Jordan, then a captain in the Confederate Army. She was credited by Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president, with ensuring the South's victory at the First Battle of Bull Run in late July 1861.

Nickname

A wealthy person can have the nickname "moneybag" (or "moneybags"). [5] [6] Marcus Licinius Crassus (c. 115-53 BC), a leading Roman politician in his day, was known in Rome as Dives , meaning "The Rich" or "Moneybags". Ivan I of Moscow ("Ivan the Moneybag") was a Russian Grand Duke of Moscow from 1328-1341 who was famous for being generous with his wealth. American Cardinal Francis Spellman (1889–1967) was sometimes called "Cardinal Moneybags" in his later life, while Chicago mobster and racketeer Murray Humphreys (1899–1965) was referred to as "Mr. Moneybags" by his friends. Miss Moneybags (played by Edna Purviance) is a fictional character in the 1915 Charlie Chaplin silent comedy film The Count . James Edward "Baron of Edgerton" Hanson's (1922–2004) billion-dollar empire earned him the nickname "Lord Moneybags". Another fictional character, Victor Newman (Eric Braeden) of The Young and the Restless soap opera, has also been called "Moneybags".

Postcard (postmarked 1907) depicting John Bull and Uncle Sam under sign "To Canada" bringing in sacks of money "for investment in Canada" PostcardToCanadaForInvestmentInCanada1907.jpg
Postcard (postmarked 1907) depicting John Bull and Uncle Sam under sign "To Canada" bringing in sacks of money "for investment in Canada"

Money bags have been represented in art and culture throughout human history, including paintings, literature, film, television, games, and even food.

In A new way to pay the National Debt (1786), James Gillray caricatured King George III and Queen Charlotte awash with treasury funds to cover royal debts, with William Pitt handing him another moneybag. National-Debt-Gillray.jpeg
In A new way to pay the National Debt (1786), James Gillray caricatured King George III and Queen Charlotte awash with treasury funds to cover royal debts, with William Pitt handing him another moneybag.

In games

Mcol money bag.svg

In various games, money bags (or bags of gold) tend to be used to represent treasure or points. In board games like Dungeon! (1975) a money bag is a treasure card, in Talisman (1983) as a card, and in Monopoly as a pawn/piece introduced in 1999. [13] The 1976 television game show Break the Bank had a money bag as a space and The Price Is Right has a pricing game called "Balance Game". Video games such as Lock 'n' Chase (1981), Bagman (1982), Pitfall! (1982), Moneybags (1983), [14] Bank Panic (1984), Circus Charlie (1984), Gunfright (1985), Roller Coaster (1985), Arm Wrestling (1985), the Castlevania series (1986-2010+), [15] and Robin Hood: The Legend of Sherwood (2002) have money bags (or bags of gold) in them. As video game characters, Moneybags is a character in the Spyro the Dragon series and a boss named Moneybags in Dual Hearts .

See also

Related Research Articles

Backpack bag carried on ones back

A backpack—also called knapsack, rucksack, rucksac, pack, sackpack, or backsack—is, in its simplest frameless form, a cloth sack carried on one's back and secured with two straps that go over the shoulders, but it can have an external frame, internal frame, and there are bodypacks.

Tea bag small, porous sealed bag containing tea leaves

A tea bag is a small, porous, sealed bag or packet containing dried plant material, which is immersed in water to make a tea or an infusion. Classically these are tea leaves, but the term is also used for herbal teas (tisanes) made of herbs or spices. Tea bags are commonly made of filter paper or food-grade plastic, or occasionally of silk. The bag contains the tea leaves while the tea is steeped, making it easier to dispose of the leaves, and performs the same function as a tea infuser. Some tea bags have an attached piece of string with a paper label at the top that assists in removing the bag while also displaying the brand or variety of tea.

Pocket small compartment in clothing where minor objects can be carried inside

A pocket is a bag- or envelope-like receptacle either fastened to or inserted in an article of clothing to hold small items. Pockets are also attached to luggage, backpacks, and similar items. In older usage, a pocket was a separate small bag or pouch.

Wallet small, flat case that is used to carry personal items such as cash

A wallet is a small, flat case that can be used to carry such personal items as cash, credit cards, and identification documents, photographs, transit pass, gift cards, business cards and other paper or laminated cards. Wallets are generally made of leather or fabrics, and they are usually pocket-sized but not always foldable.

Handbag handled medium-to-large bag that is often fashionably designed, typically used by women, to hold personal items

A handbag, also called purse in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag used to carry personal items.

Fanny pack type of pouch with a waist strap

A fanny pack or belt bag or belly bag, bum bag or ket bag (Hiberno-English) is a small fabric pouch worn by use of a strap above the hips around the waist that is secured usually with some sort of buckle. The straps sometimes have tri-glide slides, making them able to be adjusted to fit. The American and British names derive from the fact that they are often worn with the pouch above the buttocks, for which "fanny" and "bum" are the slang terms in each country respectively, although they may also be worn with the pouch at the front. The British usage of "fanny" is vulgar slang for the labia, so the name "fanny pack" is rarely used in Britain.

Carpet bag traveling bag made of carpet

A carpet bag is a traveling bag made of carpet, commonly from an oriental rug. They were a popular form of luggage in the United States and Europe in the 19th century. Some modern versions serve as handbags or purses.

Judith Leiber American fashion designer

Judith Leiber was a Hungarian-American fashion designer and businesswoman.

Messenger bag bag or pouch with a long strap, designed to wear slung from one shoulder and across the body

A messenger bag is a type of sack, usually made of cloth. It is worn over one shoulder with a strap that goes across the chest resting the bag on the lower back. While messenger bags are sometimes used by couriers, they are now also an urban fashion icon. Some types of messenger bags are called carryalls. A smaller version is often called a sling bag.

Satchel bag

A satchel is a bag, often with a strap. The strap is often worn so that it diagonally crosses the body, with the bag hanging on the opposite hip, rather than hanging directly down from the shoulder. They are traditionally used for carrying books. The back of a satchel extends to form a flap that folds over to cover the top and fastens in the front. Unlike a briefcase, a satchel is soft-sided.

Birkin bag business

The Birkin bag is a personal accessory of luggage or a tote by Hermès that is handmade in leather and named after actress and singer Jane Birkin. The bag is currently in fashion as a symbol of wealth due to its high price and use by celebrities. Birkins are the most popular bag with handbag collectors, and Victoria Beckham owns over 100 of them.

Coin purse small pouch made for carrying coins

A purse or pouch, sometimes called coin purse for clarity, is a small money bag or pouch, made for carrying coins. In most Commonwealth countries it is known simply as a purse, while "purse" in the United States usually refers to a handbag. "Purse" can also be a synonym to bursary, i.e. a monetary prize in a competition. In recent times a coin purse can also be transposed as a phone wallet replacing coins for a modern alternative, the mobile phone.

Museum of Bags and Purses Fashion Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Museum of Bags and Purses, is a museum devoted to the history of bags, purses, and their related accessories. Located in Amsterdam's historic central canal belt, the museum's collection includes over 5,000 items dating back to the sixteenth-century.

Chanel 2.55 company

The Chanel 2.55 is a luxury leather handbag or purse manufactured by the fashion house of Chanel.

Medical bag

A medical bag is a portable bag used by a physician or other medical professional to transport medical supplies and medicine.

Kate Spade New York American fashion design house

Kate Spade New York is an American luxury fashion design house founded in January 1993 by Kate and Andy Spade. Jack Spade is the brand's line for men. Kate Spade New York competes with Michael Kors. In 2017, the company was purchased by, and is now part of, Tapestry, Inc., formerly known as Coach.

Bag simple tool in the form of a non-rigid container

A bag is a common tool in the form of a non-rigid container. The use of bags predates recorded history, with the earliest bags being no more than lengths of animal skin, cotton, or woven plant fibers, folded up at the edges and secured in that shape with strings of the same material. FYI, if it's not a box... it's a bag.

Reticule (handbag) small handbag, originally with a drawstring closure, and often decorated with beadwork

A reticule, also known as a ridicule or indispensable, was a type of small handbag or purse, similar to a modern evening bag, used mainly from 1795 to 1820. According to the American Heritage Dictionary, the name "reticule" came from the French réticule, which in turn came from the Latin reticulum, a diminutive of rete, or "net". The reticule became popular with the advent of Regency fashions in the late 18th century. Previously, women had carried personal belongings in pockets tied around the waist, but the columnar skirts and thin fabrics that had come into style made pockets essentially unusable. When the reticule first appeared, it was made of netting. As time went by, they were made from all kinds of fabrics, including velvet, silk, and satin. A reticule usually had a drawstring closure at the top and was carried over the arm on a cord or chain. Reticules were made in a variety of styles and shapes and sometimes trimmed with embroidery or beading. Women often made their own reticules.

Lancel is a French luxury leather goods company, founded in Paris in 1876 by Angèle and Alphonse Lancel and developed by their son Albert.

References

  1. Fallen money bag sparks Ohio cash grab, BBC News, 25 March 2010 (retrieved 10 January 2012)
  2. John 12:6
  3. Rottweiler, Encyclopædia Britannica Online, retrieved 30 April 2010
  4. Rajesh, Orl. "Historical Review Of Tracheostomy." Internet Journal of Ophthalmology & Visual Science 4,22006 1-5. 17 Oct 2007
  5. money bag, Dictionary.com, retrieved April 04, 2010
  6. moneybags, Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. retrieved April 4, 2010
  7. Jaina-Rup̄a-Manḍạna, Volume 1, Umakant Premanand Shah, Abhinav Publications, 1987, pp. 48,73,116,121-2,124,156,219,220,233,326 ISBN   978-81-7017-208-6 at Google Books
  8. Shah, pages 125,130,178,181
  9. Shah, p.161
  10. Art of memory#Principles
  11. "I am not a crook" (Herblock's History: Political Cartoons from the Crash to the Millennium) at the United States Library of Congress, 15 Jan 2002
  12. Recycled Bank Bag, Handbag of the Day, Deidre Woollard, Luxist.com, 4 December 2009, retrieved 12 April 2010
  13. "A New Bag For Monopoly Game", CBS News, 17 March 1999, retrieved 14 March 2010
  14. Moneybags at Gamebase 64, retrieved 4 April 2010
  15. Castlevania, Mr. P's Castlevania Realm (hosted at The Video Game Museum, retrieved 12 August 2010)