Thudaca crypsidesma

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Thudaca crypsidesma
Scientific classification
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T. crypsidesma
Binomial name
Thudaca crypsidesma
Meyrick, 1893

Thudaca crypsidesma is a moth in the family Depressariidae. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from South Australia, Victoria, [1] Tasmania and Western Australia.

Moth Group of mostly-nocturnal insects in the order Lepidoptera

Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth, many of which have yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.

Depressariidae family of insects

Depressariidae is a family of moths. It has formerly been treated as a subfamily of Gelechiidae, but is now recognised as a separate family, comprising about 2300 species worldwide.

Edward Meyrick English entomologist and schoolmaster

Edward Meyrick FRS was an English schoolmaster and amateur entomologist. He was an expert on Microlepidoptera and some consider him one of the founders of modern Microlepidoptera systematics.

The wingspan is 19–20 mm. The forewings are snow white with bright orange markings. The costal edge is blackish near the base and there is a moderate streak immediately beneath the costa from the base to the costa before the apex. A subdorsal streak, black edged above, is found from the base to the anal angle and there are two black-edged straight transverse streaks, the first from the subcostal streak at two-thirds to above the middle of the subdorsal but not nearly reaching it, suffusedly barred with blackish grey above the middle, the second from the extremity of the subcostal to the subdorsal before the extremity, suffused with blackish grey towards the costa and on a bar above the lower end. There is also a blackish line along the hindmargin. The hindwings are grey. [2]

Wingspan distance from the tip of one limb such as an arm or wing to the tip of the paired limb, or analogically the same measure for airplane wings

The wingspan of a bird or an airplane is the distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip. For example, the Boeing 777-200 has a wingspan of 60.93 metres, and a wandering albatross caught in 1965 had a wingspan of 3.63 metres, the official record for a living bird. The term wingspan, more technically extent, is also used for other winged animals such as pterosaurs, bats, insects, etc., and other fixed-wing aircraft such as ornithopters. In humans, the term wingspan also refers to the arm span, which is distance between the length from one end of an individual's arms to the other when raised parallel to the ground at shoulder height at a 90º angle. Former professional basketball player Manute Bol stands at 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m) and owns one of the largest wingspans at 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m).

The larvae probably feed on Leptospermum species. [3]

<i>Leptospermum</i> genus of plants

Leptospermum is a genus of shrubs and small trees in the myrtle family Myrtaceae commonly known as tea trees, although this name is sometimes also used for some species of Melaleuca. Most species are endemic to Australia, with the greatest diversity in the south of the continent but some are native to other parts of the world, including New Zealand and Southeast Asia. Leptospermums all have five conspicuous petals and five groups of stamens which alternate with the petals. There is a single style in the centre of the flower and the fruit is a woody capsule. The first formal description of a leptospermum was published in 1776 by the German botanists Johann Reinhold Forster and his son Johann Georg Adam Forster, but an unambiguous definition of individual species in the genus was not achieved until 1979. Leptospermums grow in a wide range of habitats but are most commonly found in moist, low-nutrient soils. They have important uses in horticulture, in the production of honey and in floristry.

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