Thudaca mimodora

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Thudaca mimodora
Thudaca mimodora 2.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Depressariidae
Genus: Thudaca
Species:T. mimodora
Binomial name
Thudaca mimodora
Meyrick, 1892 [1]

Thudaca mimodora is a moth of the Depressariidae family. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from New South Wales, [2] Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory and Victoria.

Moth Group of mostly-nocturnal insects in the order Lepidoptera

Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth, many of which have yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.

Depressariidae is a family of moths. It has formerly been treated as a subfamily of Gelechiidae, but is now recognised as a separate family, comprising about 2300 species worldwide.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

The wingspan is about 20 mm. Adults have satin-white wings with two brown diagonal stripes and a brown border around each forewing. [3]

Wingspan distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip of an airplane or an animal (insect, bird, bat)

The wingspan of a bird or an airplane is the distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip. For example, the Boeing 777-200 has a wingspan of 60.93 metres, and a wandering albatross caught in 1965 had a wingspan of 3.63 metres, the official record for a living bird. The term wingspan, more technically extent, is also used for other winged animals such as pterosaurs, bats, insects, etc., and other fixed-wing aircraft such as ornithopters. In humans, the term wingspan also refers to the arm span, which is distance between the length from one end of an individual's arms to the other when raised parallel to the ground at shoulder height at a 90º angle. Former professional basketball player Manute Bol stands at 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m) and owns one of the largest wingspans at 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m).

The larvae feed on the new shoots of Leptospermum . They are green and live in a slight web. The pupa is attached to a leaf by a cremaster and sticks out. It is unprotected by a cocoon.

<i>Leptospermum</i> genus of plants

Leptospermum is a genus of shrubs and small trees in the myrtle family Myrtaceae commonly known as tea trees, although this name is sometimes also used for some species of Melaleuca. Most species are endemic to Australia, with the greatest diversity in the south of the continent but some are native to other parts of the world, including New Zealand and Southeast Asia. Leptospermums all have five conspicuous petals and five groups of stamens which alternate with the petals. There is a single style in the centre of the flower and the fruit is a woody capsule. The first formal description of a leptospermum was published in 1776 by the German botanists Johann Reinhold Forster and his son Johann Georg Adam Forster, but an unambiguous definition of individual species in the genus was not achieved until 1979. Leptospermums grow in a wide range of habitats but are most commonly found in moist, low-nutrient soils. They have important uses in horticulture, in the production of honey and in floristry.

Related Research Articles

Tortricidae family of insects

The Tortricidae are a family of moths, commonly known as tortrix moths or leafroller moths, in the order Lepidoptera. This large family has over 10,350 species described, and is the sole member of the superfamily Tortricoidea, although the genus Heliocosma is sometimes placed within this superfamily. Many of these are economically important pests. Olethreutidae is a junior synonym. The typical resting posture is with the wings folded back, producing a rather rounded profile.

Tortricini tribe of insects

The Tortricini are a tribe of tortrix moths.

<i>Hepalastis pumilio</i> species of insect

Hepalastis pumilio is a moth of the family Pterophoridae. It has worldwide tropical distribution, including Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Japan, Micronesia, South Africa the Virgin Islands as well as Queensland and New Guinea.

The Hypertrophinae are a subfamily of small moths in the family Depressariidae. The subfamily was described by Thomas Bainbrigge Fletcher in 1929.

Thudaca is a moth genus of the family Depressariidae.

Thudaca calliphrontis is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from South Australia.

Thudaca campylota is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

Thudaca crypsidesma is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from South Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and Western Australia.

Thudaca cymatistis is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

<i>Thudaca haplonota</i> species of insect

Thudaca haplonota is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

<i>Thudaca heterastis</i> species of insect

Thudaca heterastis is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

Thudaca ophiosema is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

Thudaca orthodroma is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

Thudaca stadiaula is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

Thudaca trabeata is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Edward Meyrick in 1893. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from New South Wales, South Australia, Western Australia and Tasmania.

Thudaca circumdatella is a moth in the family Depressariidae. It was described by Francis Walker in 1864. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from New South Wales.

Thudaca monolechria is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Alfred Jefferis Turner in 1947. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Queensland.

Thudaca obliquella is a moth in the family Depressariidae. It was described by Francis Walker in 1864. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from New South Wales, Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, Tasmania and South Australia.

Erechthias beeblebroxi is a moth of the family Tineidae. It is endemic to Australia, where it has been recorded from Queensland.

References

  1. Australian Faunal Directory
  2. Thudaca at Markku Savela's Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms.
  3. lepidoptera.butterflyhouse