Tibetan astronomy

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The Tantra of Kalachakra is the basis of Tibetan astronomy. It explains some phenomena in a similar manner as modern astronomy science. Hence, Sun eclipse is described as the Moon passing between the Sun and the Earth. [1]

In 1318, the 3rd Karmapa received vision of Kalachakra which he used to introduce a revised system of astronomy and astrology named the "Tsurphu Tradition of Astrology" (Tibetan: Tsur-tsi) which is still used in the Karma Kagyu school for the calculation of the Tibetan calendar. [2] [3]

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References

  1. An Introduction To Tibetan Astro. Science Archived February 3, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  2. The Third Gyalwa Karmapa, Rangjung Dorje, site of Karma Lekshey Ling Institute [ dead link ]
  3. Staff. "Kagyu Lineage: The Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje (1284 - 1339)". Kagyu Office of His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa. Retrieved 2010-02-04.

Further reading