Timeline of Abu Dhabi

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Contents

Prior to 20th century

20th century

21st century

February 3–5.

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan</span> Sheikh of Abu Dhabi from 1966 to 2004

Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan was an Emirati royal, politician, philanthropist and the founder of the United Arab Emirates. Zayed served as the governor of Eastern Region from 1946 until he succeeded Sheikh Shakhbut as the ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1966, and then as the first president of the United Arab Emirates while he retained his position as Abu Dhabi's ruler from 1971 until his death in 2004. He is revered in the United Arab Emirates as the Waalid al-Ummah, credited for being the principal driving force behind uniting seven emirates.

Sheikh Shakhbut bin Dhiyab Al Nahyan was the Ruler of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi from 1793 to 1816, now part of the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Sheikh Dhiyab ibn Isa Al Nahyan was the Sheikh of the Bani Yas of the Liwa Oasis from 1761 to 1793 and the founder of the Al Bu Falah dynasty, which still rules Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), today.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shakhbut bin Sultan Al Nahyan</span> Emirati politician (1905–1989)

Shakhbut bin Sultan Al Nahyan was the ruler of Abu Dhabi from 1928 to 1966. On 6 August 1966, Shakhbut was deposed by members of his family with assistance from Britain in a bloodless coup. His younger brother, Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan succeeded him as the ruler of Abu Dhabi.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Emirate of Abu Dhabi</span> Constituent emirate of the United Arab Emirates

The Emirate of Abu Dhabi is one of seven emirates that constitute the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is the largest emirate, accounting for 87% of the nation's total land area or 67,340 km2.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">House of Nahyan</span> Royal family in the United Arab Emirates

The House of Nahyan is the ruling royal family of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, and one of the six ruling families of the United Arab Emirates. The family is a branch of the House of Al Falahi, a branch of the Bani Yas tribe, and are related to the House of Al Falasi from which the ruling family of Dubai, the Al Maktoum, descends.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Abu Dhabi</span> Capital of the United Arab Emirates and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhabi is the capital of the United Arab Emirates. It is also the capital of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi and the centre of the Abu Dhabi Metropolitan Area. Abu Dhabi is the UAE's second-most populous city after Dubai.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hamdan bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan</span> Emirati royal and politician

Hamdan bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan is an Emirati royal and politician. He is the ruler's representative in Al Dhafrah region of Abu Dhabi. Sheikh Hamdan is a son of the late Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, President of the United Arab Emirates and Emir of Abu Dhabi. Hamdan is the younger brother of both former UAE president Khalifa bin Zayed and the current president, Mohamed bin Zayed.

Maktoum bin Butti was the joint founder and first ruler of Dubai, today one of the United Arab Emirates, alongside Obeid bin Said bin Rashid, with whom he led a migration of the Al Bu Falasah from Abu Dhabi, seceding from the Bani Yas.

Obeid bin Said bin Rashid was the first Ruler of Dubai under the Al Bu Falasah, jointly leading a migration of the tribe from Abu Dhabi alongside Maktoum bin Butti bin Sohail. He ruled for three years prior to his death in 1836.

Sheikh Khalifa bin Shakhbut Al Nahyan was the Ruler of Abu Dhabi, one of the Trucial States which today form the United Arab Emirates (UAE), from 1833 to 1845. His bloody accession led to the secession of the Al Bu Falasah and the establishment of the Maktoum dynasty in Dubai.

Sheikh Saeed bin Tahnun Al Nahyan was the Ruler of Abu Dhabi, one of the Trucial States which today form the United Arab Emirates (UAE), from 1845 to 1855.

Sheikha Salama bint Butti Al Qubaisi was the wife of Sheikh Sultan bin Zayed bin Khalifa Al Nahyan, Ruler of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi from 1922, and the mother of Sheikhs Shakhbut and Zayed. Other children include Hazza bin Sultan, who was the Ruler's Representative of the Western Region of the Emirate, and died in 1958.

The Dhawahir is a tribe of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The tribe's main centre was the Buraimi Oasis and the village, then town of Al Ain. They have long had a strong alliance with the Ruling family of Abu Dhabi, the Al Nahyan, and the Bani Yas confederation.

The Sudan is an Arab tribe of Qahtanite origin in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Qatar and other Gulf states.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Abu Dhabi Central Capital District</span> Place in United Arab Emirates

Abu Dhabi Central Capital District, officially "Abu Dhabi Region", also called "Abu Dhabi Metropolitan Area", is the municipal region in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi that contains the city of Abu Dhabi, distinct from the Eastern and Western municipal regions of the Emirate. Abu Dhabi City is the capital of both the Emirate and the United Arab Emirates, and has its own local government.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Khaled bin Mohamed Al Nahyan</span> Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi since 2023

Sheikh Khaled bin Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, is Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi. He was appointed to the role on 29 March 2023. He is the eldest son of Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the United Arab Emirates.

The political history of the United Arab Emirates covers political events and trends related to the history of the United Arab Emirates.

Mubarak bin Mohammed Al Nahyan (1935–2010) was an Emirati royal and the first interior minister of the United Arab Emirates. He also held other public posts which were mostly security-related.

References

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  3. 1 2 "United Arab Emirates Time Line", Atlas of the Middle East, Washington DC: US Central Intelligence Agency, 1993 via University of Texas, Perry–Castañeda Library Map Collection
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  8. "United Arab Emirates: Directory". Europa World Year Book. Europa Publications. 2004. p. 4331+. ISBN   978-1-85743-255-8.
  9. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link)
  10. Chronicle of Progress: 25 Years of Development in the United Arab Emirates. London: Trident Press. 1996. ISBN   978-1-900724-03-6.
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  13. "Etihad Corporate Profile". Etihad Airways. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
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  18. "Two killed in gas explosion at a restaurant in Abu Dhabi". Gulf News. 31 August 2020. Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  19. "Update: Two dead in Abu Dhabi restaurant gas leak blast". The National. 31 August 2020. Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  20. "Three killed, several hurt in two UAE restaurant blasts". Reuters. 31 August 2020. Retrieved 31 August 2020.

Bibliography